Flower

Posts Tagged ‘zoo’

Celebrate Visit the Zoo Day!

Today is Visit the Zoo Day. The annual event encourages Americans to spend the day at their local zoo. Zoos offer many learning opportunities and can be an enriching field trip experience. They give students the opportunity to view wildlife they would never otherwise encounter. If you want to celebrate Visit the Zoo Day or you want to create a memorable field trip for your students, consider visiting one of these amazing zoos.

Polar Bear at the San Diego Zoo

Polar Bear at the San Diego Zoo
(Credit: Michelle Brault)

1. San Diego Zoo

The 100-acre San Diego Zoo is one of the largest zoos in the world, with more than 3,500 animals representing over 650 species and subspecies. The goal of San Diego Zoo Global, the umbrella organization for the San Diego Zoo, is to help end extinction. San Diego Zoo Global participates in more than 130 conservation projects in over 35 countries and has reintroduced 43 species into the wild.

 

Giant Panda at Zoo Atlanta

Giant Panda at Zoo Atlanta
(Credit: Michelle Brault)

2. Zoo Atlanta

Zoo Atlanta opened its doors in 1889. It is one of only four zoos in the United States where you can view giant pandas. Over 1,300 animals are housed at the zoo, including 40 mammal species and 50 bird species.

 

Lions at Zoo Miami

Lions at Zoo Miami
(Credit: Michelle Brault)

3. Zoo Miami

Zoo Miami is the oldest and largest zoological garden in the state of Florida. The unique South Florida climate allows the zoo to display a wide range of animals from Australia, Africa, and Asia. It is home to over 3,000 animals. 500 diverse species are represented, including over 40 endangered species.

Bear Mountain at the Denver Zoo

Bear Mountain at the Denver Zoo
(Credit: Michelle Brault)

 

4. Denver Zoo

The Denver Zoo features over 4,000 animals, including Dall’s sheep, black rhinos, kangaroos, tigers, and grizzly bears. The Denver Zoo boasts one of the most unique exhibits I have ever seen–Bear Mountain. The revolutionary exhibit was built in 1918 and is a national historic landmark. The natural-style animal enclosure lets visitors view grizzly bears at eye level without fences or bars.

 

Giraffes at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Giraffes at Cheyenne Mountain Zoo
(Credit: Michelle Brault)

5. Cheyenne Mountain Zoo

Located in Colorado Springs, Colorado, Cheyenne Mountain Zoo is “America’s only mountain zoo!” The zoo covers 146 scenic acres and is home to more than 750 animals. It is known for its prolific giraffe herd.

Have you visited any of these zoos? Are you planning a visit or a field trip to your local zoo? Comment below or tweet us using #ProQuest.

Subscribe via email to Share This and never miss a post.

 

Happy Centennial, San Diego Zoo!

The San Diego Zoo is celebrating its 100th anniversary. I’ve visited the San Diego Zoo twice and both times I was amazed by the sheer size of the zoo. Located in Balboa Park, the 100-acre San Diego Zoo is one of the largest zoos in the world, with more than 3,700 animals representing over 650 species and subspecies. The goal of San Diego Zoo Global, the umbrella organization for the San Diego Zoo, is to help end extinction. San Diego Zoo Global participates in more than 130 conservation projects in over 35 countries and has reintroduced 43 species into the wild. In honor of the San Diego Zoo’s centennial, here are some interesting facts about the history of the world-famous zoo.

Bai Yun, a female Giant Panda at San Diego Zoo, California

Bai Yun, a female Giant Panda at San Diego Zoo, California
By Mfield, Matthew Field, http://www.photography.mattfield.com (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), [ CC-BY-SA-3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

It All Started with a Roar

The idea of opening a zoo in San Diego was conceived by Dr. Harry Wegeforth. On September 16, 1916, the local physician was driving past Balboa Park with his brother, Paul, when he heard an abandoned lion roaring. The lion had been left over from an exhibit for the 1915-1916 Panama-California Exposition. Dr. Wegeforth said to his brother, “Wouldn’t it be splendid if San Diego had a zoo! You know…I think I’ll start one.”

Beginnings

Dr. Wegeforth, his brother, Dr. Fred Baker, Frank Stephens, and Dr. Joseph Thompson formed the Zoological Society of San Diego (now San Diego Zoo Global) on October 2, 1916. Originally, the San Diego Zoo consisted of animal exhibits left behind from the Panama-California Exposition.

In 1917, a brown female bear named Caesar became one of the first animals given to the San Diego Zoo. Caesar had been living on a Navy ship as a mascot, but after getting too rambunctious, the sailors decided to donate her to the new zoo. When Caesar arrived at the harbor, zoo officials didn’t have any trucks to transport her. Dr. Thompson, the acting director of the zoo at the time, sat her in the front seat of his roadster and drove her to her new home at the San Diego Zoo.

Zoo Exhibit Design

The San Diego Zoo became the first zoo in the United States to display animals in open-air grottoes in the 1920s. The exhibits featured large moats as an alternative to cages. This meant there were no longer bars between the zoo animals and the visiting public.

Balboa Park

The Board of Park Commissioners for the City of San Diego approved the site for the zoo in Balboa Park in 1921. The same year, Ellen Browning Scripps donated $9,000 for a fence to indicate the zoo’s designated boundaries. Her donation made it possible for the zoo to charge an admission fee of 10 cents when it had its grand opening in January 1923.

Giant Pandas Arrive

In 1987, San Diego fell in love with two giant pandas Basi and Yuan Yuan when they came to the zoo for a 200-day visit. The pandas were seen by over 2 million people during their stay. The appearance of two giant pandas outside of China was a rare event. By hosting the giant pandas, the San Diego Zoo gave people the opportunity to see the charismatic species in person and raised awareness about their endangered status.

On September 10, 1996, two giant pandas from the People’s Republic of China arrived at the San Diego Zoo. Bai Yun and Shi Shi were part of a landmark 12-year research loan agreement that has been extended multiple times. On August 21, 1999, Bai Yun gave birth to Hua Mei, who is the first surviving giant panda cub born in the United States.

The black-and-white bears remain as popular as ever among zoo visitors. I visited the San Diego Zoo in the beginning of 2016 and I believe the wait time to view the pandas was between 1-2 hours.  Unfortunately on that visit I didn’t get a chance to see the pandas because I spent too much time admiring my favorite animal–the polar bear. Have you been to the San Diego Zoo? What’s your must-see animal at the San Diego Zoo? Comment below or tweet us using #ProQuest.

If you’re not able to visit the San Diego Zoo in person, check out the zoo’s videos and live cams to see your favorite animal. To learn more about the San Diego Zoo, explore these resources available in SIRS Issues Researcher.

Animal Attractions: Amazing Tales from the San Diego Zoo

San Diego Zoo

San Diego Zoo Animals

San Diego Zoo Centennial

San Diego Zoo’s Panda Cam