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Posts Tagged ‘states’

Challenge Your Students to This Women’s History Quiz!

How well do you know U.S. women’s history?

To celebrate Women’s History Month, take this Playbuzz quiz to see if you can pair up the correct state with an event in U.S. women’s history. Each question is based on facts taken from SIRS Issues Researcher timelines, including the one for our Women’s Rights Leading Issue.

(If you can’t view the matching game below, you can access it on PlayBuzz.)

What are you doing with your students to celebrate Women’s History Month?

Tweet us at #ProQuest or comment below!

CultureGrams—Teaching Activities: Understanding Election Results

Did you know that CultureGrams offers almost 80 free teaching activities to its subscribers? If you don’t have access to CultureGrams, enjoy this free teaching activity today and sign up for a free trial of the product to access more.

colorstates

CultureGrams USA map

Understanding Election Results

Grade level: K–5

Objective: Students will learn about the Electoral College while understanding the numerical basis for election results and
practicing various computations.

Common Core State Standards Initiative: Anchor Standards for Reading: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7. Integrate and evaluate content presented
in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.

Time Requirement
Preparation: 40 minutes
In-class: 2 hours, two different days; less, if some is done as homework

Materials: CultureGrams States Edition

Instructions
1. Begin by handing out a printout of the PDF outline map of the U.S. to each student, along with coloring utensils. Give the students a list of which states voted for Mitt Romney (color red) in the
2012 presidential election and which states voted for Barack Obama (color blue) and have them color in the map accordingly.
2. When the students are done, tell them that the country was split fairly evenly in this election, with 51% of the nation voting for Obama and 47% voting for Romney. Yet, from looking at the amount of red on the election map, they might think that far more people voted for Romney. Talk about how the Electoral College works, explaining that each state gets a number of electoral votes based on its total number of senators and representatives, the latter of which is based on population.
3. Using this formula (senators + representatives = electoral votes), have the students use the information in the Government section of the CultureGrams States Edition to fill in their map with the numbers of electoral votes each state has. Compare the sum of the blue states’ electoral votes and those of the red states. Are they closer than the map makes them appear?
4. Explain to students that, typically, it is thought that states that are home to large urban populations (and are therefore more densely populated) tend to be democrat, while those home to rural populations (and therefore more sparsely populated) tend to be republican. Have students test this assumption using the Create-Your-Own-Table function in the States Edition. Have students create tables that display the population densities (population per sq. mi.) for both red and blue states. Using this data, have them create and compare averages for each group. What do their findings prove?

Questions for further discussion
1. Why might more densely populated states vote democratic, while more sparsely populated ones vote
republican?
2. The Electoral College has come under fire as being out of date and unfair. Do the students agree?
Why or why not?

Extension activity
Provide electoral maps for several past presidential elections. As they compare the maps, they should note which states should be classified as “swing states”; that is, which states alternate between voting for republican and democratic candidates.

United States Research Projects

This is the time of year for class projects. My daughter’s 3rd grade class was assigned a project for social studies. Each student chooses a state in the U.S. and once the project is complete, they present it to the class. There are 38 students in both 3rd grade classes, so they were able to cover most of the states. Some students used poster board with pictures and text (see photo below), some constructed dioramas, and others wrote a report and brought in photos and postcards. The teacher encouraged the students to wear clothes associated with the assigned state, or to bring in foods common in that state. I think this is a great way to learn new information about the United States.

TN state project

Tennessee State Project
Image by Jennifer Oms

Something that helped my daughter while she was doing her research was SIRS Discoverer Country Facts and CultureGrams States Edition. These products offer wonderful information on each state in the U.S.

SIRS Discoverer State Facts includes a statehood timeline, map and flag, state symbol photos, population information, and more! In addition, SIRS Discoverer offers Country Facts and Canada Facts.

ProQuest SIRS Discoverer: Country Facts--Tennessee

ProQuest SIRS Discoverer: Country Facts–Tennessee

 

CultureGrams States Edition includes a detailed map of each state, flag, symbols, interesting facts about each state, population information, history, and more. CultureGrams also offers the Provinces Edition, World Edition, and Kids Edition.

CultureGrams States Edition

ProQuest CultureGrams: States Edition

Both products offer beautiful, full-color, printable PDFs for each state. Next time your students have a class project, turn to SIRS Discoverer and CultureGrams!

How do you approach research of U.S. states in your classroom? Comment below or tweet us at #ProQuest.

eLibrary – What Do You Know About Your State?

Quick! What’s the capital of Montana? Why does Hawaii’s state flag have an image of the United Kingdom’s Union Jack? How many U.S. presidents were born in Virginia? You can find the answers to these questions and many more by viewing eLibrary’s Research Topics. eLibrary has a Research Topic dedicated to each of the 50 states.

Searching for a state’s Research Topic is easy.  All you do is type in the state’s name in the basic eLibrary search box.

eLibrary Basic Search

 The Research Topic for the state you are looking for will be the first result in your search.  The main image on each state’s page will be of that particular state’s capitol building, along with a brief description of  that state.

State Capitol & Brief Description

Next, you will see a section called Snapshot, where you will find a map of the state, an image of the state flag, and links to basic information about the state.

Snapshot

Then you will find a Gallery of photos related to that state. You can click on any of these images and go right to that photograph in eLibrary.

State Gallery

You will then find a section called Past & Present where you will be directed to articles about the state’s history and current events in the state.

Past & Present

Lastly you will find a section where you will find information on a wide variety of topics, including Famous People from that state, tourist attractions or information about the natural habitat of that state.

Famous People

eLibrary’s Research Topics can be your first stop in learning about your own state or all 50 states!

Tom Mason