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Posts Tagged ‘Research Topics’

National History Day 2017 in eLibrary

The 2017 National History Day theme, Taking a Stand in History, has been established, and eLibrary is ready to help students get a start on their research. We have created a jump page that features links to Research Topics related to many of the topics suggested on the National History Day website.

If you are not familiar with National History Day, it is a national program that provides a broad theme and challenges students to take a deep look at history and develop a documentary, exhibit, paper, performance or website. From NHD’s site:

…The intentional selection of the theme for NHD is to provide an opportunity for students to push past the antiquated view of history as mere facts and dates and drill down into historical content to develop perspective and understanding.

The NHD theme provides a focused way to increase students’ historical understanding by developing a lens to read history, an organizational structure that helps students place information in the correct context and finally, the ability to see connections over time.

Following local and state events showcasing the projects, the program culminates in a national contest featuring the top entries from around the world. This school year’s national contest will be held June 11-15, 2017.

Check out our ProQuest Research Topic Guide: National History Day.

ProQuest Research Topic Guide: National History Day

ProQuest Research Topic Guide: National History Day via eLibrary

 

A Fresh Crop of ProQuest Research Topics

We’ve had a downright tropical environment in Louisville this summer, giving us the ideal conditions for growing Research Topic pages! There are 80 new pages since the end of last school year, covering topics like the Juno and Galileo missions to Jupiter, America’s role in World War I, the Brexit, and of course, Pokémon GO.

Research Topics are a great tool for student research, offering a wealth of editorially-curated articles, pictures, video, and websites to supplement study units throughout the year. With 11,000 Research Topics, chances are we have what you need!

Click on the video below to learn the different ways to discover the Research Topic you’re looking for:

 

The General Election Begins

eLibrary continues to follow the election with frequent updates of its U.S. Presidential Election, 2016 Research Topic page. Currently, the page has a recap of the conventions and Research Topic profiles of the candidates and their running mates. It also includes the profiles of third-party candidacies of Libertarian Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein. The page also has a section with up-to-date polling articles, including a link to the aggregate polling website RealClear Politics, a section on campaign issues and political analysis, and a section on campaign finance and influence. As the debates unfold, we will provide analytical articles of the debates from different viewpoints, along with continued updates of the polls before and after the debates.

Below are more Research Topic resources for your research and discovery:

April Training Webinars Posted

Libraries see surge in e-book demandNow’s a great time to catch up on the important elements of your ProQuest K-12 resources. We’ve posted our April webinars and would like to invite you to join us. Share this information also with some of your key faculty who you know would benefit from greater familiarity with your excellent ProQuest library research and learning tools. Our new public webinar page also expands your view of ProQuest possibilities. Not only may you access training for your K-12 focused resources, but you may also learn more about ProQuest’s full array of research and learning tools. Many of these have potential application in advanced secondary learning environments.

Sign up now for a class of your choice. If you don’t see the resource you’re looking for, contact us and we would be happy to schedule a private webinar with you!

This Day in History–March 15: More Than Just Caesar

March 15 is most famous as the day Julius Caesar got whacked in the Senate by Brutus and conspirators in 44 BC. (You can read about the “Ides of March” in an item posted on this blog a couple of years ago: click, please) But what else happened on this day? Well, keep reading and follow the links embedded in the text to see Research Topics and other resources in eLibrary.

Revolutions of 1848 Research Topic via ProQuest eLibrary

Revolutions of 1848 Research Topic via ProQuest eLibrary

-1848: The Hungarian Revolution broke out. Led by fiery journalist Louis Kossuth and spurred on by a Kossuth-inspired uprising in Vienna, protesters took to the streets, demanding freedom of the press, an independent government and more. The revolt was at the beginning of more than a year of unrest in the Habsburg Empire that saw Austrians, Hungarians, Slovenes, Poles and others attempting to gain independence. The Hungarian Revolution was part of a wave of revolts, known collectively as the Revolutions of 1848, which swept across Europe. The contagious nature of these events would be seen again a century and a half later in the Revolutions of 1989 and the Arab Spring in 2011. (While we’re at it, bonus uprising: Hungarian Revolution of 1956.)

-1913: Woodrow Wilson held the first U.S. presidential press conference … by accident. The new president was scheduled to meet members of the press one by one to develop a rapport like that he had with journalists when he was governor of New Jersey. Because of the large number of reporters who showed up, he decided to address them collectively, initiating what has become the regular way presidents communicate with the press and the American people.

1917: Nicholas II, the last emperor of Russia, abdicated. Years of hardship in Russia due to involvement in World War I brought about the February Revolution, part of the Russian Revolution, in which waves of strike and protests against the government broke out. Nicholas came to the decision that his rule was untenable, and he gave up power. Later that year, as the Bolsheviks seized power in the October Revolution, Nicholas and his family were imprisoned and later executed. Only in 2008 were the bones of all of the victims positively identified, putting an end to rumors that a couple of them escaped.

1944: The Third Battle of Monte Cassino began. In January of 1944, during the Italian Campaign of World War II, the Allies began a bloody operation to break through the Germans’ Gustave Line and get to Rome. The third of these assaults involved a huge amount of bombing that destroyed the town of Cassino. After a fourth assault, the Germans were finally driven out, but at the cost of 55,000 Allied casualties.

And how about this for up-to-the-minute?: Pope Francis is scheduled to have meeting with Catholic cardinals TODAY at which he is expected to sign the papers to officially declare Mother Teresa a saint.

This Day in History: Stephen Decatur Burns the USS Philadelphia, 1804

The flames … ascending her rigging and masts, formed columns of fire, whilst the discharge of her guns gave an idea of some directing spirit within her.”

Burning of the Frigate 'Philadelphia'

Burning of the Frigate ‘Philadelphia’ via ProQuest eLibrary

This was the scene in Tripoli Harbor on February 16, 1804 as the USS Philadelphia burned during the first Barbary War. But it wasn’t the enemy who set her afire; it was an American party led by Lieutenant Stephen Decatur, Jr., the 24-year-old son of the very naval officer who commissioned the Philadelphia four years before.

The war against the Barbary states arose from President Thomas Jefferson‘s refusal to continue to pay tribute (payments) to those states for protection of American merchant ships from pirates. A number of prior attacks had meant ever-increasing ransoms demanded by the pirates. Years earlier, in a letter to John Adams, Jefferson had called for the use of naval forces to deal with the situation. In 1801 Jefferson sent ships to the area, and in 1802 Congress granted authorization to seize ships and protect American vessels, and the war was officially on.

The Philadelphia, commanded by William Bainbridge, ran aground on a reef in Tripoli Harbor and was eventually surrendered after Bainbridge attempted to make the ship unusable by the enemy. The Tripolians managed to get the ship afloat again, and Commodore Edward Preble ordered Decatur to try and repossess the ship or destroy it.

Sir, you are hereby ordered to take command of the prize ketch Intrepid. It is my order that you proceed to Tripoli, enter the harbor in the night, board the Philadelphia, burn her and make good your retreat … The destruction of the Philadelphia is an object of great importance. I rely with confidence on your intrepidity and enterprise to effect it.

The Intrepid, previously named Mastico, had been captured from the Tripolians, and Decatur disguised the ship as a merchant vessel run by a small Arab-speaking crew. Decatur and most of the men hid below deck. Under the ruse that the ship had lost its anchor, permission was sought to tie up to the Philadelphia. When the two ships were aside one another, Decatur and the other men burst out and onto the Philadelphia, easily overcoming the crew aboard. In a matter of minutes, 20 of the enemy were dead and others had jumped ship. The Americans then proceeded to send the ship up in flames and quickly retreat to the Intrepid.

The gun deck was all of a sudden beautifully illuminated by the numerous candles of the crew. The squads … repaired to their stations. After the lapse of a few minutes Captain D demanded at every hatchway, from forward to aft, whether they were ready, and-on being answered in the affirmative from below-returned to the hatchways as before, giving the word succinctly at each, “Fire!”-in order of insuring the simultaneousness of setting fire to every part of the ship alike.

Decatur was deemed a hero, with legendary Admiral Horatio Nelson reportedly declaring “his actions “the most bold and daring act of its age.” The young naval officer became a celebrity. Towns and ships were named after him, he was the subject of paintings and busts, and his image even appeared on household items like cups and pitchers. His career took off, and he took part in many other military engagements, including the Second Barbary War and the War of 1812.

Unfortunately, his distinguished career was cut short in 1820 when he died in a duel with Commodore James Barron, whom Decatur criticized over his conduct in an engagement with the British known as the ChesapeakeLeopard Affair.

The links in the text above provide a mere sample of all of the great information to be discovered in eLibrary. So, get searching in eLibrary and browsing in our ever-expanding list of Research Topics.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Religious Witness for Human Dignity

In 2013, Mary Scanlon uncovered a piece of history at a Goodwill store in Phoenix, Arizona. Even though she didn’t even own a tape machine, she started looking through boxes of reel-to-reel tapes. Among them was a reel with “Martin Luther King” and “Tempe” written on it.

She bought the tapes, then turned to Arizona State University to conduct research on her discovery. She found that Dr. King had spoken there in 1964, advocating for passage of the Civil Rights Act. Rob Spindler, the ASU archivist and curator of special collections, was unaware of any recordings of that event.

Spindler was excited to hear the recording, as well as the other tapes from local civil-rights activist Lincoln Ragsdale. They’ve since been digitized and are available from the Arizona State University Digital Repository.

eLibrary’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Research Topic Page now includes the story of this fortunate discovery, and features a link to the ASU archive where you can listen to the recording, “Religious Witness for Human Dignity”. That same section of the Research Topic includes a scholarly journal article that explores the deep personal and religious roots of Dr. King’s doctrine of human dignity.

Martin Luther King Jr. Research Topic

Martin Luther King Jr. Research Topic Page via ProQuest eLibrary

Part rally, part sermon, it is thrilling to hear Dr. King’s voice, and it carries a message that remains as urgent today as it was when he delivered it over 50 years ago:

“Through our scientific and technological genius, we have made of this world a neighborhood, and now through our moral and ethical commitment, we must make of it a brotherhood. We must all learn to live together as brothers, or we will all perish together as fools.”

King, Martin Luther, Jr. “Religious Witness for Human Dignity.” MP3 Audio. Arizona State University Digital Repository. Web. 1 Feb. 2016.

Celebrate National Skating Month!

U.S. Figure Skating recognizes January as National Skating Month. It is a time for ice skating rinks and figure skating clubs to celebrate and promote the sport. When I was growing up, I dreamed of becoming a figure skating coach. I started taking ice skating lessons when I was five and fell in love with the sport. In honor of National Skating Month, I would like to share some interesting facts about three of my favorite female figure skaters.

Dorothy Hamill Research Topic Screencap

Dorothy Hamill Research Topic Screencap via ProQuest eLibrary

Dorothy Hamill: At 19-years-old, Dorothy Hamill captured the gold medal in women’s figure skating at the 1976 Winter Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria. Hamill quickly became known as “America’s Sweetheart” because of her sweet personality, bobbed hairstyle, and skating skills—she invented her own signature spin, the “Hamill camel.” Shortly after the Olympics, Hamill won the World Championship title in Gothenburg, Sweden. She then decided to turn professional and toured with the Ice Capades from 1977-1984. Hamill won a Daytime Emmy award for her performance in the 1983 production of “Romeo & Juliet on Ice.” She also competed on the 16th season of “Dancing with the Stars” in 2013.

Katarina Witt Research Topic Screencap

Katarina Witt Research Topic Screencap via ProQuest eLibrary

Katarina Witt: Katarina Witt is a two-time Olympic champion, four-time World champion, and six-time European champion. The East German figure skater captivated both judges and spectators with her technical skating skills, beauty, charisma, and showmanship. She won her first Olympic gold medal in women’s figure skating at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, and her second at the 1988 Winter Olympics in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. She became the first female figure skater since Sonia Henie to retain her Olympic title. Following her victory at the 1988 World Championships, Witt retired from amateur competition and embarked on her professional skating career. She toured with other world-class figure skaters, including fellow Olympic gold medalist Brian Boitano and headlined her own skating shows. She ended her successful professional skating career in 2008.

Sasha Cohen Research Topic Screencap

Sasha Cohen Research Topic Screencap via ProQuest eLibrary

Sasha Cohen: Sasha Cohen is one of the most graceful and beautiful figure skaters of all time. Her given name is Alexandra Pauline Cohen. Sasha is a Ukrainian nickname for Alexandra. The 2006 U.S. figure skating champion is known for her flexibility, exquisite spirals, and outstanding spins. Cohen finished fourth at the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah. Four years later, she won the silver medal at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino, Italy. In addition to performing in ice shows, Cohen has also engaged in acting. She has done commercials, guest starred on television shows, and landed movie roles. Cohen made a cameo appearance as herself in the movie “Blades of Glory.” On Jan. 22, 2016, Cohen was inducted into the U.S. Figure Skating Hall of Fame.

You can read more about these Olympic figure skaters and the sport of figure skating in eLibrary. Check out these resources:

Figure Skating Research Topic

Dorothy Hamill Research Topic

Katarina Witt Research Topic

Sasha Cohen Research Topic

The 2016 Presidential Election Is Gearing Up

By this time next year, a new president will have been sworn into office. Will it be Donald Trump or Ted Cruz? Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders? Will a dark horse emerge from the Republican Party? Has election fatigue set in yet? Are you ready for it to be over?

The campaign for a new president seems to start earlier every election cycle. And although Ted Cruz was officially the first candidate to throw his hat into the ring just last March, his speech and posturing, along with incessant media speculation, started well before his announcement. And he surely was not the only one. Hillary Clinton did not announce her candidacy until April last year, but speculation about her candidacy had been rampant right after President Obama was inaugurated for his second term.

One week from today, the first primaries and caucuses will begin the long, arduous process of seating a new president, beginning with Iowa on February 1st, and then New Hampshire the following week.

The process of electing a president begins with narrowing the field of candidates through individual state primaries and caucuses leading up to the Republican and Democratic national conventions in July. Unless something unexpected happens, expect the field of candidates to narrow considerably after Iowa and New Hampshire.

State primaries, like New Hampshire’s, are typical elections by voters, where the general public go to the polls to cast secret ballots. Unlike New Hampshire, a caucus like Iowa’s is a system of state-wide local gatherings where voters decide which candidate they will support and to select delegates to represent their state at the national convention. Historically, caucuses were the most common way of electing party candidates. They recall  a day when up or down votes were cast by cigar-chomping delegates in smoke-filled halls who would call out yea or nay their nominees of choice. Today, most states hold primaries, with only 10 states holding caucuses.

After Iowa and New Hampshire, the caucuses and primaries of Nevada and South Carolina at the end of February, respectively, will lead to Super Tuesday on March 1, where 14 states (and the territory of American Somoa) will cast their votes. Typically, by the time all of the primaries and caucuses have ended in June, a candidate from each party will have emerged as their respective nominee, and it will be on to Philadelphia, where the Democratic Party will hold their national convention, and to Cleveland, which hosts the Republican Party’s convention.

eLibrary has a dedicated selection of Research Topics focused on current and past presidential elections that are good resources for you social studies and government classes. We have an active, updated U.S. Presidential Election, 2016 Research Topic that will help you keep tabs on the current campaign with profiles of each current and former candidates, polls and surveys, political issues and analyses, and primary updates to each current campaign. eLibrary also has Research Topics of past presidential elections (see below), along with a ProQuest Research Topic Guide on elections in the United States here.

Below are more Research Topic resources for your research and discovery:

What’s the Latest?

Schools Training Page

“What’s the Latest?” is a big question, actually.  In the research database world, everything is dynamic and constantly changing and updating.  In 2015, ProQuest SIRS Discoverer was all new.  ProQuest CultureGrams also received new looks — twice during the year — once over the summer, and again last month in December.  Content is continually being updated as well.  Most recently, we moved our “offices” — online, that is.  You have a new place to log into your ProQuest K-12 resources, and the training team has a new place for you to go to join us for training.  Sounds like a great time to get to know your resources even better!

Contact the ProQuest Training and Consulting Team to learn all about what’s new and what’s so important about your ProQuest resources. You can contact us directly to arrange a free meeting or join us in one of our public webinars, as noted above. We’re happy to answer your questions and help you get a great start to the second half of this academic year!