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Posts Tagged ‘Recipes’

A Taste of Morocco: Recipe from CultureGrams

One of the best (and definitely the most delicious) ways to experience a new culture is by sampling the local cuisine! On a recent trip to Morocco, I seized every opportunity I had during my short stay to experience the many sights, smells, and flavors of Fez. My first stop was at a little restaurant where I was served a little bowl of spiced heaven, called harira. Many people have heard of Morocco’s famous chicken tagine and couscous but harira, a traditional Moroccan soup made from lamb, lentils, and chickpeas, is equally authentic and delectable.

With over 1,000 recipes from around the world, CultureGrams makes it possible for users to experience a new culture in their very own kitchens. Feeling adventurous as well as hungry? Try out this authentic Moroccan Harira recipe from CultureGrams and bon appétit! Or as they say in Morocco, Sahten! (صحتين), which literally means “two healths.”

Harira is the traditional meal eaten to break the fast during Ramadan; it usually is served with dates, figs, and special sweets called chabakiya. Photo by Jenni Boyle

 

Harira

Ingredients
Broth:
1 pound lamb, cut in small pieces
1 small onion, minced
1 cup chickpeas, soaked overnight (or from a can)
2 pounds canned crushed tomatoes
2 quarts water
1/4 cup olive oil
1/3 cup minced fresh parsley
6 to 7 strands saffron (soaked in a few tablespoons of hot water)
1/2 to 1 teaspoon pepper
2/3 teaspoon ginger
1 cube bouillon (optional)
Salt

Other ingredients:
1/3 cup lentils
1/2 lemon
1/4 cup rice
1/4 cup broken up angel hair pasta
1/3 cup minced fresh cilantro
Salt
3 tablespoons flour
1 egg

Directions
1. Cook the lentils in salted water. When done, drain them and squeeze the lemon over them. Set aside.
2. Cook all of the broth ingredients in a soup pot over low heat for 50 to 60 minutes, or enough time to cook the meat and the chickpeas.
3. Add the rice, pasta, cilantro, and salt. Allow to simmer another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.
4. Mix the flour with a little water to form a paste and then add this to the soup a little bit at a time; stir constantly to avoid lumps.
5. Add the lentils and let cook for another 5 minutes. Harira should be creamy but not thick. If it is thick, add water and cook for a few more minutes; if it is too thin, thicken with more flour-and-water paste.
6. Some break an egg into the soup during the last 5 minutes of cooking and mix it well to keep it liquid.
7. Serve in bowls with lemon wedges on the side for those who want to add it to their soup.

Have you ever tried making a recipe from CultureGrams? Tweet us @CultureGrams and lets us know how it turned out.

CultureGrams: Ethiopian New Year’s Recipe

Woman makes injera

An Ethiopian woman makes injera, a common flat bread eaten during New Year’s [photo by Salym Fayad; via the CultureGrams Photo Gallery]

This coming Sunday, September 11, is New Year’s in Ethiopia. Called Enkutatash, New Year’s is celebrated on September 11 (or sometimes the 12th, due to leap years) rather than January 1 because the main Ethiopian calendar is not based on the Gregorian calendar. Instead, Ethiopians use a unique solar calendar based on the Coptic calendar, and there is a seven- or eight-year difference between the Ethiopian calendar and the Gregorian one.

New Year’s is one of the most popular holidays in Ethiopia. It corresponds with the end of the rainy season, and Ethiopians clean their homes and decorate. On New Year’s Eve, families and friends commonly hold a special meal, and people also may gather on New Year’s Day after attending church to eat together and drink coffee. Popular foods during the New Year include lamb, wat (stew), and injera (flat bread). People also sing, dance, and light torches to celebrate the holiday, and youth may attend nightclubs. Also traditional on this holiday is for children to wear new clothes and pick flowers to give to friends and family.

A popular dish for many Ethiopian holidays (including New Year’s) is doro wat, a chicken stew. Try the recipe below from CultureGrams’ recipe collection this September 11 to celebrate Ethiopian New Year’s!

Doro Wat

Doro wat [photo by stu_spivack; via Wikimedia Commons]

Doro Wat

Note

Ethiopians serve this dish by placing the stew on a large platter in the center of the table and using injera (flat bread) to scoop up individual bites.

Ingredients

2 to 3 pounds chicken
3 sticks butter
3 pounds onion, finely chopped
2 large cloves garlic, minced, or 2 teaspoons powder
3 heaping tablespoons berbere (a hot spice mixture)*
9 ounces tomato paste
Water
10 hard-boiled eggs
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Directions

  1. Remove skins from chicken and score each piece with a knife.
  2. In a large pot, melt the butter. Sauté the onions and garlic in the butter for 5 minutes. Add berbere, followed by tomato paste, stirring occasionally. Simmer for about 15 minutes. Stir in a piece of chicken at a time, coating well with the sauce. Continue to simmer, adding enough water to maintain the consistency of a thick soup.
  3. After about 20 minutes, or when the chicken is half done, add the hard-boiled eggs. Cover and continue simmering until chicken is tender.
  4. The dish is ready when the oil has risen to the top. Add black pepper and let stand until slightly cooled.
  5. Serve with injera.** Lay out a piece of injera on each individual plate. Dish the stew into the middle of the injera. Diners should tear off pieces of injera from the edges as scoops to eat the stew.

Yields

8 to 10 servings

*A recipe for berbere can be found in the CultureGrams Ethiopia recipes collection

**A recipe for injera can also be found in the CultureGrams Ethiopia recipes collection

CultureGrams: Ramadan Recipes

iftar_oman

Iftar in Oman

Last week, June 5, was the beginning of Ramadan, a holy month during which observant Muslims worldwide fast from sunrise to sunset. Meals are eaten in the mornings before the sun rises and in the evenings when it sets. The traditional fast breaking in the evening during Ramadan is called iftar, and Muslims usually gather as friends and family to eat an evening meal. Food is also given to the poor. Although it is a tradition to break the fast with dates, customary foods eaten in the evenings during Ramadan vary by country.

CultureGrams has recipes for some of these typical Ramadan foods, including bourek (stuffed pastry rolls) from Algeria, kunafeh (a dessert) from Egypt, raqaq (a very thin bread) from the United Arab Emirates, and gulha (fried fish balls) from the Maldives.

Another of the CultureGrams Ramadan recipes is for harira (a lentil and chickpea soup). It is the traditional meal eaten in Morocco to break the fast during Ramadan and is usually served with dates, figs, and special sweets called chabakiya.

Check out the CultureGrams recipe for harira below! It’s making us hungry!

Ingredients

Broth:
1 pound lamb, cut in small pieces
1 small onion, minced
1 cup chickpeas, soaked overnight (or from a can)
2 pounds canned crushed tomatoes
2 quarts water
1/4 cup olive oil
1/3 cup minced fresh parsley
6 to 7 strands saffron (soaked in a few tablespoons of hot water)
1/2 to 1 teaspoon pepper
2/3 teaspoon ginger
1 cube bouillon (optional)
Salt

Other ingredients:
1/3 cup lentils
1/2 lemon
1/4 cup rice
1/4 cup broken up angel hair pasta
1/3 cup minced fresh cilantro
Salt
3 tablespoons flour
1 egg

Directions

  1. Cook the lentils in salted water. When done, drain them and squeeze the lemon over them. Set aside.
  2. Cook all of the broth ingredients in a soup pot over low heat for 50 to 60 minutes, or enough time to cook the meat and the chickpeas.
  3. Add the rice, pasta, cilantro, and salt. Allow to simmer another 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Mix the flour with a little water to form a paste and then add this to the soup a little bit at a time; stir constantly to avoid lumps.
  5. Add the lentils and let cook for another 5 minutes. Harira should be creamy but not thick. If it is thick, add water and cook for a few more minutes; if it is too thin, thicken with more flour-and-water paste.
  6. If desired, break an egg into the soup during the last 5 minutes of cooking and mix it well to keep it liquid.
  7. Serve in bowls with lemon wedges on the side for those who want to add it to their soup.
Harira. Photo via Wikimedia Commons

Harira. (Photo via Wikimedia Commons)

CultureGrams: Frou-Frou Recipe

Malian woman prepares frou-frou to sell. Image via CultureGrams

Malian woman prepares frou-frou to sell. Image via CultureGrams                  

Who doesn’t love pancakes? In Mali, millet pancakes, or frou-frou, are a very popular street food.  People often stop on their way to work and buy frou-frou and tea from street vendors.

Enjoy this authentic Malian recipe for frou-frou from CultureGrams‘ collection of hundreds of recipes from around the world.

Frou-frou

Ingredients:
2 cups millet, bean, or wheat flour
1 teaspoon okra powder
1 teaspoon salt
Water, as needed
Oil, as needed

Directions:
1) Mix dry ingredients.
2) Add enough water to achieve a dough-like consistency.
3) Beat the dough vigorously for 5 to 10 minutes to aerate.
4) Heat oil in a pot with a rounded bottom or in a tin with rounded holds that can be placed over a flame.
5) Add spoonfuls of dough to the hot oil. Remove from pan or tin when dough is fried on both sides and cooked through the middle, approximately 2 or 3 minutes for each cake.
6) Serve hot or cold and with salt or sugar sprinkled on top.

CultureGrams: Pupusas Recipe

Celebrate Columbus Day—often called Día de la raza (Day of the race) in Latin America—by making a delicious recipe from El Salvador: Pupusas. You will also be ready for the Festival Nacional de la Pupusa, El Salvador’s weeklong celebration of the country’s national food (November 7 to 13).

Pupusas are the national food of El Salvador for good reason! These delicious thick tortillas are stuffed with meat, beans, or cheese and it’s hard to eat just one of them. Try your hand at this savory warm dish that’s sure to be a future favorite. Find more recipes from El Salvador and every other country in the world in the CultureGrams collection here!

El Salvador_Pupusas

Credit: CultureGrams

Note:

Pupusas can be made with a meat or cheese filling. This recipe uses meat. Grated farmer’s cheese, mozzarella, Swiss, or any combination of these cheeses will work nicely.
Ingredients:

1 pound ground pork (sausage)
1/2 large onion, finely diced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 medium fresh green chili, seeded and minced
1 small tomato, finely chopped
1/4 pound white cheese, grated
1/2 teaspoon salt
5 cups flour
4 cups water, approximately
1 teaspoon vegetable oil

Directions:

  1. In a large nonstick saucepan, cook pork, onion, and garlic over high heat. If necessary, add small amounts of water to the pork to prevent sticking. When the meat is cooked thoroughly, reduce heat to low and add chili and tomato. Let mixture cook until all liquid has evaporated. Set aside to cool. Stir in the cheese and salt.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, put flour and enough water to make a dough. Divide the dough into 25 pieces and roll each into a ball. Flatten each ball between the palms of your hands to 1/2-inch thickness. Put a spoonful of the meat mixture in the middle of each disk of dough and enclose it firmly. Flatten the pupusas again until 1/2 inch thick.
  3. Heat a flat, heavy-bottomed skillet until it is very hot. Brush the skillet with a little oil. Cook the pupusas on each side for 4 to 5 minutes, until nicely browned.
  4. Serve immediately.

Hint: Using a tortilla press is an easier and quicker flattening method for beginning pupusa makers. Experts slap the dough from palm to palm to flatten it out.

Wiener Schnitzel Recipe

Wiener schnitzel, popular in Austria, might sound slightly exotic, but if you like fried chicken, you’ll be a fan of this recipe. Whip up this dish quickly with the recipe below or take the time to pound the meat with a tenderizer before adding the bread crumbs for an even better texture. Find more recipes from Austria and every other country in the world in the CultureGrams collection here!

 

Austria_WienerSchnitzel_PeterStone

Austrian Weiner Schnitzel.
Image by Peter Stone via ProQuest CultureGrams

Note: The Viennese adopted this dish from Italy during the Austro-Hungarian Empire.

Ingredients:

2 eggs, slightly beaten
1/3 cup milk
4 to 6 veal (or pork) cutlets
Flour, enough to coat cutlets
1 1/2 cups plain bread crumbs
1 cup oil (or lard), heated in skillet until hot
Directions:

  1. Mix eggs and milk. Dip cutlets into flour. Dip cutlets into egg-milk mixture. Carefully coat with bread crumbs, but not too heavily. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes to seal coating.
  2. Deep-fry cutlets in lard until browned on both sides, about 3 or 4 minutes. Turn cutlets several times during cooking. Do not pierce. Remove cutlets from lard with tongs, and drain over pan for a few seconds before removing to absorbent paper.

Curry Seafood Soup

In the mood to try something new? This Malaysian curry laksa is filled with a variety of seafood and fresh vegetables, making it a healthy and flavorful choice. Find more recipes from Malaysia and every other country in the world in the CultureGrams collection here!

Malaysia_LaksaSoup

Malaysia Curry Seafood Laksa Soup
via ProQuest CultureGrams

Ingredients:

1 pound raw prawns
1 pound fish fillets
3 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
4 ounces crabmeat or 2 crabs, cooked and cut into pieces
2 tablespoons oil
8 cups water
1 pound mee hoon (rice vermicelli)
1 pound fresh bean sprouts
1 large cucumber, peeled and coarsely grated
8 spring onions or scallions
1/2 cup fresh mint leaves, firmly packed

Soup:
3 tablespoons oil
2 medium onions, quartered and finely sliced
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 teaspoons grated lemon rind, finely chopped
2 teaspoons kha (laos powder)
8 candlenuts, finely grated
6 dried chilies, seeds removed
2 teaspoons dried shrimp paste
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
4 teaspoons ground coriander
8 cups coconut milk
2 teaspoons sugar
2 1/2 teaspoons salt, or to taste
Directions:

  1. Shell and devein prawns, reserving shells and heads. Drain these thoroughly.
  2. Remove any bones and skin from fish fillets and, using a chopper, chop very finely. Mix in 1 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper and shape into small balls, or into a sausage-shaped roll, and divide into finger-width slices.
  3. Pick over crabmeat and discard any bony tissue, or chop the whole crabs into pieces after removing top shell and fibrous tissue.
  4. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a saucepan. When very hot, throw in prawn heads and shells. Fry until bright red. Add 8 cups water and 2 teaspoons salt. Cover and simmer 20 to 30 minutes, then strain. Discard shells and heads. Return stock to the fire. Drop in fish balls or slices, prawns, and crabs; cut into pieces if large. Return to a boil, then lower heat and simmer for 3 to 4 minutes. Set aside and keep warm.
  5. Scald the rice vermicelli by pouring boiling water over it. Allow it to drain in a colander. Or soak in warm water for 5 to 10 minutes and drain well.
  6. Scald the bean sprouts by pouring boiling water over them. Rinse in cold water, washing off any loose skins. Pinch off straggly brown parts. Set aside. Slice spring onions finely and set aside. Roughly chop mint and set aside.
  7. Soup: Heat oil. Fry onions, garlic, and lemon rind until onions are golden. Stir in laos powder, candlenuts, chilies, shrimp paste, turmeric, and coriander. Add prawn stock. When soup comes to a boil, add coconut milk, sugar, and salt. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring to prevent the coconut milk from curdling.
  8. Fill each bowl 2/3 full of the vermicelli. Add a handful of bean sprouts, a tablespoon each of cucumber, and sliced spring onions. Add also a large pinch of mint. Pour in boiling soup and serve immediately.

Yields: 8 to 10 servings

Walnut Roll Recipe

This walnut roll, or potica, is traditionally served during Christmas and Easter in Slovenia but it’s tasty enough to eat all year! Find more recipes from Slovenia and every other country in the world in the CultureGrams collection here!

slovenia_potica

A Slovenian Potica, or Walnut Roll via ProQuest CultureGrams

 

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups milk
2 packages dry yeast
1/2 cup sugar
6 1/4 cups flour
1/2 cup butter
4 egg yolks
1 grated lemon rind
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar, flavored with vanilla
Filling:
1/2 cup butter
4 eggs
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 dash cinnamon
1 teaspoon grated lemon rind
4 tablespoons cream
4 1/2 cups grated walnuts
Directions:

  1. Pour 4 tablespoons milk into a cup. Add yeast, 1/2 tablespoon sugar, and 1 tablespoon flour. Let mixture double in bulk (about 10 minutes).
  2. Cream butter in a mixing bowl. Add 3 egg yolks, grated lemon rind, and remaining sugar.
  3. Slowly add remaining milk. Add the yeast mixture, salt, and remaining flour. Mix well.
  4. Let dough stand for 15 minutes, until it doubles its bulk. If it is too soft, add a little flour. Let it rise. Divide dough into 3 parts and roll them into rectangles the length of the baking pan you will use.
  5. Make the filling by creaming the butter, eggs, and sugar. Add cinnamon, grated lemon rind, cream, and half the grated walnuts. Spread filling evenly on the 3 sheets of dough. Sprinkle them with other half of the walnuts. Form 3 tight rolls and place them into a buttered pan.
  6. Let stand in warm place for 40 minutes. Brush lightly with 1 beaten egg yolk. Bake in oven for about 1 1/2 hours. Cut when completely cool, place slices on a platter, and sprinkle with vanilla-flavored sugar.

Spring Rolls Recipe

This delicious spring rolls recipe–called Cha Gio–hails from Vietnam, where rice is a staple. Find more recipes from Vietnam and every other country in the world here!

vietnam_cha gio

The spring rolls are the dish on the bottom right.

Ingredients:

2 ounces cellophane noodles
2 tablespoons tree ears
1 pound ground pork
1 large onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
3 shallots or white part of 3 scallions, finely chopped
7-ounce can crabmeat
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
20 sheets round dried rice papers
4 eggs, well beaten
2 cups peanut oil, for frying
Fish sauce
Lettuce
2–3 mint leaves
Coriander
2 cucumber slices
Directions:

  1. Soak noodles in warm water for 20 minutes. Drain and cut into 1-inch lengths and set aside. Soak tree ears in warm water for 30 minutes. Drain and chop finely and then set aside.
  2. To make filling, combine noodles, tree ears, ground pork, onion, garlic, shallots, crabmeat, and black pepper in a bowl and set aside.
  3. Cut a round rice paper sheet into quarters. Place rice sheets on a flat surface. With a pastry brush, brush the beaten egg over the entire surface of each piece. Let stand for 2 minutes.
  4. When the wrapper looks soft and transparent, place about 1 teaspoon filling near the curved side, in the shape of a rectangle. Fold the sides over to enclose the filling and then roll.
  5. After filling all the wrappers, pour oil into a large frying pan. Place spring rolls in cold oil. Turn heat to medium and fry for 20 to 30 minutes, until spring rolls turn a golden brown.
  6. Set out a bowl of fish sauce for dipping. To serve, add a bit of lettuce, 2 or 3 mint leaves, some coriander, and 2 cucumber slices to a bowl. Add 1 or 2 spring rolls and sprinkle with fish sauce.

Hint: Using peanut oil for frying keeps spring rolls crispy.

 

Ceviche Recipe

Looking for a cool, tasty meal for those hot summer evenings? Try your hand at Ceviche Acapulco–a Mexican recipe from CultureGrams’ collection of over 1,000 recipes from every country in the world. You can also learn more about the ingredients in ceviche in eLibrary’s research topic on Mexican cuisine, including the fascinating history of the avocado, its many uses, and great nutritional value.

RECIPE
Ceviche Acapulco

Ingredients:

3/4 pound red snapper fillets, cut in 1-by-1/2-inch pieces 8 ounces small shrimp, peeled and deveined Juice of 6 limes

Marinade: 3/4 white onion, finely chopped 4 serrano peppers, chopped 2 tomatoes, finely chopped 3/4 cup finely chopped pimiento-stuffed green olives 1/4 cup finely chopped parsley 1/2 cup finely chopped cilantro 3/4 cup tomato juice 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons finely chopped jalapeño pepper strips, with juice 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 2 tablespoons dried and crushed oregano Salt, to taste Garnish: Avocado Cilantro, chopped


Directions:

  1. Place seafood in glass bowl. Cover with lime juice. Let sit 4 hours or overnight. Drain. Return seafood to bowl.
  2. Mix onion, serrano peppers, tomatoes, olives, parsley, and cilantro. Stir in tomato juice, oil, jalapeños with juice, Worcestershire sauce, oregano, and salt. Pour sauce over fish, mix gently, and marinate for 1 day in refrigerator.
  3. Fill serving cups with ceviche, garnished with avocado and cilantro.