Flower

Posts Tagged ‘ProQuest SIRS WebSelect’

National Aviation Day Activities

"Airplane." Photo credit: muffinman71xx / Foter / CC BY-SA

“Airplane.” Photo credit: muffinman71xx / Foter / CC BY-SA

Today is National Aviation Day, established in 1939 on Orville Wright’s birthday. Orville Wright was an American inventor credited with creating the first successful airplane with his brother Wilbur. The advances made in aviation since then have led to widespread international travel and exploration in outer space. NASA has also been able to benefit the U.S. through continued research in aeronautics. Flight has proven to be one of the most amazing discoveries of the modern world and will continue to expand into the future. Aviation advances are limitless in the eyes of tomorrow’s pilots. To celebrate National Aviation Day, we’ve compiled some activity suggestions that are intended to get you flying in the right direction!

Soak Up Some Aviation History

Aviation Search Box Screencap via ProQuest SIRS WebSelect

Aviation Search Box Screencap via ProQuest SIRS WebSelect

A great starting point for aviation history is ProQuest SIRS WebSelect. Here you will find editorially-selected websites that can be used in research, to complement lessons and as a basis for learning more about the history of flight. This resource is perfect for back-to-school planning. Some key selections include:

Head to an Aviation Museum

Aviation museums are a nice way to explore aviation history. Each museum is designed differently and allows visitors a unique experience every time. These museums can be found in the U.S. and abroad. The National Museum of the United States Air Force in Ohio is considered to be the world’s largest and oldest military aviation museum. A list of the world’s best aviation museums can be found through the CNN article “World’s 14 Best Aviation Museums.”

Build an Airplane

A fun way to engage with flight and invention is by making your own paper airplane. Trying different types of designs and folding techniques can get you excited about this pastime and remind you that it’s still ok to channel your inner child. This could even be an activity you share with your own children or students. Once everyone is up to speed, you could hold a paper airplane contest to see whose creation flies the farthest. Check out this Smithsonian.com article “How to Fold a World Record-Setting Paper Airplane” to help guide your design and execution.

Watch Airplanes at the Airport

A special but rare find at airports these days are observation decks. If you’re lucky enough to live in a city whose airport has one, you may want to make a visit this summer. Since airport security is quite tight now, having the opportunity to watch the airplanes go by can really feel like a treat. The next time you plan a trip by plane, consider including time to sit at an observation deck and really take in all it has to offer. They may not be around forever.

Thank a Pilot After Your Next Trip

Summer is a popular time of year to plan our vacations and travels. Each time we make the decision to board a plane, we hope for safe travels and arrivals. If you’re going to be traveling by plane soon, consider thanking your pilot. You could write a personalized thank you note while on board and hand deliver it to your pilot, contact your airline and provide positive feedback about your experience or recognize your favorite pilot on social media. Sometimes it’s nice to show them your appreciation and it probably makes their job that much more rewarding too.

How will you celebrate National Aviation Day? Let us know in the comments below or tweet us at #ProQuest.

International Jazz Day: Creative Lesson Ideas

"International Jazz Day -- UN Music Ensemble 2014." Photo credit: US Mission Geneva / Foter / CC BY-ND

“International Jazz Day — UN Music Ensemble 2014.”
Photo credit: US Mission Geneva / Foter / CC BY-ND

April 30 is designated International Jazz Day by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) with the first International Jazz Day held on April 30, 2012. Because of the rich influence jazz music has had on people and events throughout history, this is a day to celebrate how jazz has strengthened cultural and historical ties all over the world. Music is often said to be a universal language, and jazz music especially speaks to audiences from all different backgrounds. To foster jazz appreciation in the classroom, consider devoting a day or more to sharing the contributions of jazz musicians, how jazz music coincided with the Civil Rights Movement, the women of jazz or create an activity that students can do together to express themselves artistically.

Here are some ideas to start customizing a lesson focused around jazz!

1. Jazz-Themed Classroom Tools: ProQuest SIRS WebSelect contains multiple resources to influence classroom instruction and guide discussion. Some websites that can be found here can help you start planning for a jazz-themed lesson:

Jazz in America — Great resource for building a lesson or curating ideas for projects.

Jazz: A Film by Ken Burns — This PBS documentary transports viewers to earlier jazz days.

Smithsonian Jazz — Educational ideas for bringing jazz to the classroom. 112 Ways to Celebrate Jazz is a fun compilation of ideas to spread jazz appreciation.

NPR: Jazz — Packed with videos, interviews, sound clips, webcasts and more all about jazz.

2. Adventure: The International Jazz Day website suggests organizing a field trip to a local record store and then having students design their own jazz album covers or having the class create a jazz wall mural together.

3. Investigate: Maybe you live in a place where jazz has made a major impact on the community. Turn your students into investigative reporters and have them find out what jazz accomplishments make their hometown special. Older students can decipher public records to back their research. Share as a class.

4. Concert: If you’re a music teacher or librarian, encourage students to add some new jazz songs to their repertoire or organize a jazz concert. Any ticket sales can be donated to a charity of their choice.

5. Documentary Show & Share: Since jazz is such an interactive form of expression, share a jazz documentary with your students and challenge them to express how it made them feel. Let them show or tell their classmates through words, pictures or their own creative project. Ask them why it’s important to continue teaching and learning about it.

How do you support jazz appreciation? Tweet us at #ProQuest or let us know in the comments below!