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Posts Tagged ‘ProQuest Editorial Websites’

First Sales of Coca-Cola: May 8, 1886

The first glass of Coca-Cola was served on May 8, 1886, in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. John Stith Pemberton was a physician and pharmacist who made and sold medicines, photographic chemicals, and cosmetic products in his state-of-the-art laboratories. Among these were a popular perfume called Sweet Southern Bouquet, and a patent medicine known as French Wine Coca. It was advertised as a “nerve tonic, a mental aid, a headache remedy, and a cure for morphine addiction.” The product contained wine and coca leaves from South America and was served at pharmacy counters.

Old Coca-Cola Sign [public domain] via Library of Congress

Old Coca-Cola Sign [public domain] via Library of Congress

In 1886, Atlanta experimented with an early prohibition law. Since Pemberton’s drink was made with wine, he needed to change the formula. He experimented in his home laboratory to create a new drink that was sweetened with sugar instead of wine. By May 1886, his new formula was ready. Pemberton carried a jug of syrup down the street to Jacobs’ Pharmacy, where it was sold as a soda fountain drink for a nickel a glass. The beverage was later named “Coca Cola”–from its two “medicinal” ingredients: extract of coca leaves and kola nuts. Although the name was used in the marketplace starting in 1886, the Coca-Cola trademark was not registered in the U.S. Patent Office until January 31, 1893.

Ticket for free glass of Coca-Cola, believed to be the first coupon ever. <br/> By Coca-Cola [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Ticket for a free glass of Coca-Cola, believed to be the first coupon ever.
By Coca-Cola [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Dr. Pemberton never realized the potential of his invention. In failing health, he gradually sold portions of his business to various partners. In 1888, just before his death, he sold his remaining interest in Coca-Cola to Asa Griggs Candler, an Atlanta banker, real estate developer and manufacturer of patent medicines. Candler’s genius was in marketing and promotion. In order to get customers to try the product, he created the first coupon, which offered a complimentary glass of Coca-Cola at any fountain. Between 1894 and 1913 an estimated 8.5 million drinks free drinks had been served, and by 1895 Coca-Cola was being sold in every state.

An Original 1915 Contour Coca-Cola Prototype Bottle Designed by Earl R. Dean. By Gavinmacqueen [public domain] via Wikimedia Commons

An Original 1915 Contour Coca-Cola Prototype Bottle Designed by Earl R. Dean. By Gavinmacqueen [public domain] via Wikimedia Commons

Consumer demand increased even further in the summer of 1894 when the first Coca-Cola was bottled in Vicksburg, Mississippi. This ultimately led to another brilliant innovation–the unique and iconic bottle. Before refrigeration, soft drinks were kept in coolers of ice. Competitors used similar bottles, and the paper labels often fell off as they soaked in ice water, so consumers often couldn’t distinguish the real thing. So in 1915, the company asked bottling partners to design a new bottle.

In the design brief, they called for A bottle which a person could recognize even if they felt it in the dark, and so shaped that, even if broken, a person could tell at a glance what it was.The winning design was submitted by the Root Glass Company of Terre Haute, Indiana. Ironically, it was mistakenly based on the shape of a cocoa pod, which is NOT one of the ingredients of Coca-Cola.  The naturally occurring minerals in the sandstone of the local cliffs gave the glass bottle its distinctive green color.

If you want to find out more about the history of this iconic American beverage, view the ProQuest eLibrary Research Topic page on Coca Cola, or visit these websites available on SIRS WebSelect:

 

11 Facts About September 11

On September 11, 2001, the world changed forever when al Qaeda terrorists hijacked four American airliners and used them to carry out the deadliest terrorist attacks on American soil in U.S. history.

Here are 11 facts about September 11 that you may or may not know:

A New York City firefighter looks at the ruins of the World Trade Center at dawn on Sept. 12, 2001, a day after the terrorist attacks. (Credit: Jim Macmillan/Philadelphia Daily News/MCT)

A New York City firefighter looks at the ruins of the World Trade Center at dawn on Sept. 12, 2001, a day after the terrorist attacks.
Image by Jim Macmillan/Philadelphia Daily News/MCT via ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

1. A total of 2,977 people were killed–including the passengers, crew and 19 hijackers aboard the four planes, those in the World Trade Center buildings and the Pentagon. Also killed were 343 New York City firefighters, 23 New York City police officers and 37 Port Authority officers who were responding to the attacks. Another 10,000 people were treated for injuries, many seriously.

2. Ben Sliney was on his first day on the job as the FAA’s National Operations Manager on September 11. Shortly after the attacks, he made the decision to ground all aircraft within the continental U.S., and all aircraft already in flight were told to land immediately. Within four hours, almost 4,500 planes had safely landed. For the first time in history, the entire airspace over the U.S. and Canada was closed except for military, police, and medical flights, and civilian air traffic was not allowed to resume until September 13, 2001.

3. In the days following the attacks most skyscrapers in major cities across the United States were closed, along with State capitols and many government buildings surrounding them, as well as many U.S. landmarks. The stock market closed for four trading days after the attacks. Most major sporting events were canceled or postponed until after Sept 16–including Major League Baseball, NFL and collegiate football games, NASCAR races, and the 2001 Ryder Cup of golf.

4. A third skyscraper–World Trade Center Building 7–a 47-story building and one of the largest in downtown Manhattan—also fell during the attacks. The building was the site of the command center of the city’s Office of Emergency Management.

5. Only 291 dead bodies were recovered “intact” from Ground Zero.

6. It took firefighters 100 days (until December 19) to extinguish all the fires ignited by the attacks in New York.

7. The Department of Homeland Security was created in response to the attacks. It merged 22 governmental agencies into one, including the Customs Service, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the U.S. Coast Guard and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

8. Cleanup at Ground Zero officially ended on May 30, 2002. It took 3.1 million hours of labor to clean up 1.8 million tons of debris. The total cost of the cleanup was $750 million.

9. According to the Office of Chief Medical Examiner of the City of New York, of the 2,753 people reported missing at the World Trade Center, 1,115 victims, or 41 percent of the total, have not been identified as of May 10, 2014.

10. The National September 11 Memorial Museum opened on May 21, 2014, in New York City.

11. As a result of the attacks, September 11 is now remembered each year in the USA as Patriot Day.

SIRS WebSelect offers editorially-selected websites with resources and information for educators and students on the 9/11 attacks, as well as thousands of other subjects. Learn more about that fateful day and its aftermath at these websites:

9/11: Timeline of Events

National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States

Remembering 9/11

Understanding 9/11: A Television News Archive

 

On This Day: Magellan Reaches the Pacific

A Voyage That Changed the World. On this day almost 500 years ago (November 28, 1520), the Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan reached the Pacific Ocean. Magellan had departed from Spain with five ships and about 270 men on September 20, 1519, financed by the Spanish King Charles V. His plan was to try to reach the Spice Islands (present-day Indonesia) by sailing westward. He sailed along the eastern coastline of South America, hoping to find a strait that would lead to Asia. On October 21, 1520, Magellan reached the strait that now bears his name, though he called it Estrecho de Todos los Santos (Strait of All Saints). The voyage through the cold and treacherous waters of the 350-mile strait took 38 days. When he finally reached the calm and gentle waters of the ocean, he named it Mar Pacifico, which means “peaceful sea” in Portuguese.

Map of Ferdinand Magellan’s Route (Credit: AP)

Map of Ferdinand Magellan’s Route (Credit: AP)

Though he is commonly known as the first explorer to circumnavigate the globe, he never actually completed the voyage. He was killed by native warriors on Mactan Island in the Philippines on April 27, 1521, over his attempt to convert them to Christianity. After Magellan’s death, Juan Sebastian Del Cano took command of the expedition. Only one ship, the Victoria, carrying 18 men and its cargo of spices, eventually returned to Spain on September 6, 1522, after the three-year journey. While Magellan did not survive the trip, he became famous for leading the first voyage around the world–a feat so inconceivable at the time that it was not repeated for another 58 years (by the English sea captain Sir Francis Drake in 1580). His voyage changed the world by revealing the true circumference of the earth, the vast extent of the Pacific Ocean, and provided practical proof that the Earth was round, not flat.

SIRS WebSelect has a wealth of editorially selected, reliable and credible Internet resources on vital issues and topics for educators and student researchers. Check out the sites below to learn about Magellan’s life, his historic voyage, and other explorers of his era.

10 Surprising Facts About Magellan’s Circumnavigation of the Globe

European Voyages of Exploration

Exploring the Early Americas

Ferdinand Magellan

Ferdinand Magellan’s Voyage Round the World, 1519-1522 CE

Featured Web Sites: November 2013

ProQuest editors daily curate educational web sites for SIRS products that are relevant, credible, reliable and appropriate to students.

National American Indian Heritage Month
Utes–Chief Sevara [i.e., Severo] and family c. 1899
Credit: Library of Congress [public domain]

Check out these sites for Veteran’s Day, National American Indian Heritage Month, Thanksgiving, and more:

National Museum of the American Indian

Poetic Likeness: Modern American Poets

A Seat at the Table

Stem Cell School

Veterans Day

You Are the Historian: Investigating the First Thanksgiving

Find SIRS editorial-selected web sites in the search results for SIRS Discoverer and SIRS Issues Researcher.

Worst Australian Wildfires in 50 Years Spark Climate Debate

Eucalyptus oil-laden forests, or man-made climate change? This is the current debate surrounding the wildfires raging in Australia–the nation’s worst in half a century–as the annual bushfire season is evidently growing longer and more destructive. As scientists continue to research the connection between climate and pyrogeography, harness their findings in the classroom.

Image from NASA’s Aqua satellite on October 21, 2013. Dozens of wildfires continued to burn in New South Wales, Australia. The fires had already destroyed more than 200 homes, and Australian authorities were concerned that hot, windy weather could exacerbate the situation. (Credit: NASA/Jeff Schmaltz)

Dozens of wildfires continued to burn in New South Wales, Australia on October 21, 2013. The fires had already destroyed more than 200 homes, and Australian authorities were concerned that hot, windy weather could exacerbate the situation. (Credit: NASA/Jeff Schmaltz)

Help your students understand the difference between natural variations in climate, and environmental changes that can be attributed to the impact of human beings. Put our Essential Questions to use, weighing both sides of the argument over the link between global warming and increased natural disasters. Explore a wealth of point-of-view articles offering varying stances on the debate, or discover the natural disaster content available through SIRS’ WebSelect–a collection of editorial, hand-selected websites that will support any classroom lesson.

As the hotly debated topics of climate change and global warming burn on, enable your students to hop off the fence, and land where their analysis takes them.

 

 

Summer Professional Development Classes Now Posted

Register ClassesThe training team has now posted our July-August professional development classes for K-12 resources.  Come join us to learn about the extensive opportunities ProQuest provides for expanding the worlds of our young learners.  Here are a few examples. . .

e-books from ebrary — ever growing in interest and use in the K-12 world, ebrary provides opportunities for unlimited access to tens of thousands of information-rich non-fiction e-books, along with annotation, sharing capabilities, document uploading, and more. . .

CultureGrams — CultureGrams lets you experience authentic culture as if you were actually there, from recipes to famous people to customs and lifestyles, in multi-media format. . .

ProQuest Research Library Prep, ProQuest Central K-12, and the ProQuest platform — world-class resources for students in all curriculum areas, combined with the challenge of college-level research functions and content. . .

eLibrary, My eLibrary, and BookCarts — a long-standing leading resource for K-12, eLibrary’s content sets a standard of excellence for research.  eLibrary provides eight different media types in one single location, including authentic web content that is right on target.  eLibrary also provides over 7,000 Research Topics pages, giving students context from some of the best available content on most major topics with just a single keyword search, and BookCarts and My eLibrary take eLibrary even further by providing unique ways of taking notes and completing inquiry-based research projects. . .

SIRS Knowledge Source and SIRS Discoverer — SIRS resources are award-winning collections that are constructed at the article level, and carefully indexed with Library of Congress subject headings.  With SIRS, young researchers can learn from the earliest reading levels, use graphic organizers and readers’ theaters, and older researchers can laser focus on major issues and topics for debate and position papers, looking at pro/con and everything in between, meeting the needs of Common Core requirements. . .

There’s more — science, literature, and history just to name a few.

Whether you currently use ProQuest or simply want to know more, the ProQuest Training Team is here to help give you a full understanding of what the possibilities are with all of our varied resources.  And better yet, all of our training services are available to you at no cost.  You can even bring your whole faculty to meet with us — just contact us to learn more.  Come join us today!

Websites Found in SIRS Researcher

Search Results List ScreencapAttention, educators! Did you know that SIRS Issues Researcher offers access to reliable and credible editorially-selected website content and resources? SIRS editors regularly monitor website content to ensure access, appropriateness and quality. Educators and students can search by subject heading, keyword, natural language, or topic browse queries, then find website content by narrowing the search results to WebSelect Sites.

Each SIRS Issues Researcher Leading Issue (covering over 330 issues important in the school curriculum) also includes a featured interactive website. For example, select the Gun Control Leading Issue to view the associated interactive.
screencap for Gun Control Interactive

Or choose one of these websites from the results list:

The Killer at Thurston High

The Right to Bear Arms

Standing Committee on Gun Violence

You can also search or browse exclusively for website content via the SIRS WebSelect portal. Go to SIRS Issues Researcher to find the best internet resources to support K-12 teaching and learning.

Educational Web Sites

ProQuest editors daily curate educational web sites for SIRS products that are relevant, credible, reliable and appropriate to students.

Screencap of Albert Einstein site, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

In this addition of Featured Web Sites, editors highlight resources in social studies, science and the arts including poetry:

Albert Einstein

From Ideas to Independence

Mind the Gap

Ocean Tracks

Poetry Foundation

War on Poverty

Find SIRS editorial-selected web sites in the search results for SIRS Discoverer and SIRS Issues Researcher. Also see the Featured Web Sites section of SIRS WebSelect.

March 2013 Featured Web Sites

ProQuest editors daily curate educational web sites for SIRS products that are relevant, credible, reliable and appropriate to students.

Screencap of “A Brief History of Women in Combat” from NPR

In the March 2013 edition of Featured Web Sites, editors highlight resources in college search, women’s rights, astronomy, language, history, and health:

A Brief History of Women in Combat

Ancient Observatories

College Scorecard

Endangered Languages

Grand Central: 100 Years Grand

The Great Flu

Find SIRS editorial-selected web sites in the search results for SIRS Discoverer and SIRS Issues Researcher. Also see the Featured Web Sites section of SIRS WebSelect.

February 2013 Featured Web Sites

ProQuest editors daily curate educational web sites for SIRS products that are relevant, credible, reliable and appropriate to students.

Screencap of African American History Month Site from the Library of Congress

In the February 2013 edition of Featured Web Sites, editors highlight resources for African American History Month, February holidays, and Celebrate Children’s Authors and Illustrators Week:

African American History Month

Children’s Book Council

Chinese New Year

Preserving the Legacy of the Black Experience

Punxsutawney Groundhog Club

Valentine’s Day

Find SIRS editorial-selected web sites in the search results for SIRS Discoverer and SIRS Issues Researcher. Also see the Featured Web Sites section of SIRS WebSelect.