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Posts Tagged ‘motion pictures’

Drive-In Theater Anniversary, Pre-Summer Movie Study

By now school is winding down in most places, and students and educators are getting ready for some summer fun. It just so happens that today is the anniversary of an icon of summer entertainment: the drive-in movie theater. The first permanent drive-in was opened by Richard Hollingshead, Jr. in Pennsauken, New Jersey, on June 6, 1933. Although it didn’t last long, it started a craze that peaked in the 1950s, when more than 4,000 theaters were operating. That number has dwindled to a few hundred, with the latest challenge being the movie industry’s transition to expensive digital projection systems.

Lawrence of Arabia Research Topic

Lawrence of Arabia RT, eLibrary

Okay, so eLibrary doesn’t have a Research Topic on drive-ins, but it does have a number of pages related to film history, genres and specific movies. If you are still in school and you need to fill some of the last days with something fun but meaningful, how about encouraging your students to watch some great movies over the summer. You could discuss film criticism, the relationship between films and their literary source materials or just let students scoop up some trivia. If you are already out of school and you are still reading this, you might as well check them out for yourself and use them to enhance your own movie enjoyment as you take a much-needed break from school.

Motion Pictures
Talking Films
2001: A Space Odyssey

Gone with the Wind
The Godfather Films
Star Wars
Casablanca
Horror
Apocalypse Now
Lawrence of Arabia
Singin’ in the Rain
Alfred Hitchcock

This a limited list; we have plenty of pages on film directors, actors and movies. Just search around.

Summertime Flicks

"Titanic" opened in U.S. movie theaters on December 19, 1997. Most of the story takes place aboard the ill-fated "RMS Titanic" during her maiden voyage in 1912. The movie won 11 Academy Awards including Best Picture of 1997. The film inspired a legion of devoted fans but was also widely criticized for rampant historical inaccuracies. The film starred Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslett and was directed by James Cameron. <br \> Image courtesy of the Advertising Archives Limited, via ProQuest SIRS Renaissance [Public Domain]

“Titanic” opened in U.S. movie theaters on December 19, 1997. Most of the story takes place aboard the ill-fated “RMS Titanic” during her maiden voyage in 1912. The movie won 11 Academy Awards including Best Picture of 1997. The film inspired a legion of devoted fans but was also widely criticized for rampant historical inaccuracies. The film starred Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslett and was directed by James Cameron.
Image courtesy of the Advertising Archives Limited, via ProQuest SIRS Renaissance [Public Domain]

Summer is a season for picnicking, swimming, playing at the park, or reading a book while lying in the sun. But when the days get too hot or if outdoor activities are paused due to rain, movies are a fun alternative. But how do you choose among the diverse array of films available in the theaters?

Special effects and sensational stories make for blockbuster films that moviegoers attend in droves, such as this summer’s “World War Z” and “Superman.” Pedro Almodovar’s comedy “I’m So Excited” may suit those of you seeking a foreign-film experience. A fan of Emma Watson of the “Harry Potter” franchise? Check out “The Bling Ring,” based on a true story of a glamour-obsessed teenage thief. Want to sit back and laugh with animated characters? “Monsters University” will fit the bill. Or be moved and inspired by globally significant films featured at this summer’s Human Rights Watch Film Festival, including the documentaries “99 Percent” and “The Undocumented.” To pair literature and film, “Legend of Sleepy Hollow” may be the perfect fit.

Whatever your preference, get to the movie theater and enjoy! And be sure to check out SIRS Renaissance for articles on summer films. Feel free to expand your search to learn more about motion pictures, including silent films, foreign films, Hollywood films, independent films, and documentary films.