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Posts Tagged ‘Kids Edition’

CultureGrams Extremes Tables

Can you list the ten largest countries in the world? What about the smallest? Can you name the ten most populous countries? The ten countries with the youngest or oldest populations? Do you know which countries have the most women in parliament or the fewest internet users? What countries have the largest number of airports or the smallest number of physicians per 10,000 people. For answers to these and many other questions, check out CultureGrams Extremes Data Tables. These fascinating tables list top and bottom ten countries in a variety of categories. Links to the tables can be found in the lower portion of the left navigation bar on our Graphs and Tables page.

Extremes Table via ProQuest CultureGrams

But these top ten and bottom ten tables aren’t included merely as a source of geographical  and cultural trivia. They can also foster discussion and critical thinking. Students might be asked to think about why particular countries are on a specific Extremes table and what those countries have in common. For example, what do countries with a low population density have in common? What factors might result in certain countries having high or low life expectancy?

Also, they could discuss the impact of a country being very high or low in a particular category. What impact does it have on a country if it has low public school enrollment or high life expectancy? What effect might an aging population have on a country? What about a very young population?

And another option might be to look at some of the tables and consider how certain data in the tables might be misinterpreted. If one looks at the countries with the highest public spending on education, does that mean that those populations are the best educated? Why or why not?

Although they make up only a small part of the CultureGrams database, the Extremes tables are a tool that will  yield valuable insights to those who are able to think critically about what is revealed in the numbers.

SIRS Discoverer Spotlight of the Month: Winter Holidays Around the World

The winter season is here! For many people, the winter season means cold, wind, and snow. Trees may be bare and the ground could be icy. The sun may set sooner, delivering darkness to our late afternoons. Whether you live in a place that’s cold, hot, or somewhere in between, winter means lots of fun holidays and celebrations around the world.

Christmas Tree

Christmas Tree
Image by Susanne Nilsson via flickr is licensed under CCA-SA 2.0 Generic

These holidays may be associated with religious beliefs, spiritual customs, past events or cultural practices. This diversity makes each holiday very unique. Just think about all of the ways holidays are celebrated! Traditions may include festivals, lights, singing, decorations, parades, gift-giving, prayer, fairs, fasts or feasts. Each holiday has its own symbols, too, such as red lanterns for Chinese New Year, pine trees for Christmas, menorahs for Hanukkah, ears of corn for Kwanzaa, and Yule logs for the winter solstice.

Hanukkah Candles

Hanukkah Candles
Credit: Public Domain

Wonderful holidays full of light, warmth, family, and love have been created out of these cold, dark days. The Jewish holiday Hanukkah, also known as the Festival of Lights, celebrates the miracle of light with family and communal rituals, including the lighting of a Menorah candle each night for eight nights. Christmas, a Christian holiday honoring the birth of Jesus Christ, is observed with family gatherings, songs, and trees decorated with lights representing the Star of Bethlehem. Some families take part in a Kwanzaa ceremony, which incorporates candles, music, food, and blessings. A beautiful luminary can be part of the Mexican observance of Las Posadas.

Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa
Image by soulchristmas via flickr is licensed under CCA-SA 2.0 Generic

Visit SIRS Discoverer’s Spotlight of the Month and learn more about winter observances and holidays and the many ways that they light and warm our winter months.

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Comoros

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

comoros-flag

Flag of Comoros via CultureGrams

The new Comoros report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about Comoros:

  • Comoros is one of the top two producers of vanilla in the world (second to Madagascar).
  • The name Comoros came from the Arabic word qamar, meaning “moon”
  • Arab slave traders used Comoros as a base for transporting African slaves as early as the 16th century.
  • Comoros has one of the largest populations of the coelacanth fish, once called a “living fossil” because it was thought to have become extinct more than 65 million years ago, until it was rediscovered in the 20th century.

Read about local Comorian games and sports, as well as musical instruments and styles, all in this colorful new report.

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: São Tomé and Príncipe

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

F;ag of São Tomé and Príncipe via CultureGrams

Flag of São Tomé and Príncipe via CultureGrams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The new São Tomé and Príncipe report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some fascinating Did You Knows about São Tomé and Príncipe:

  • São Tomé and Príncipe is Africa’s second-smallest country by population.
  • The country’s islands are actually extinct (not active) volcanoes.
  • The island of São Tomé is located about 90 miles (145 kilometers) south of the island of Príncipe.
  • São Tomé and Príncipe was one of the first African countries to grow cocoa, which was introduced by the Portuguese in the 18th century.

Find out about popular children’s games on the islands, read about traditional street plays, and discover what life is like as a kid, all in this colorful new report.

Training for Your ProQuest Resources

Libraries see surge in e-book demandDon’t forget that ProQuest provides free training.  Our Training and Consulting Partners team is available at any time to meet with you via a privately scheduled webinar.  Just email us to make an inquiry.  We also provide regularly scheduled public webinars.  You can contact our team to discuss your questions about ProQuest resources, and we are also happy to focus privately scheduled sessions on topic areas of particular interest to you. 

This is just one of the many benefits you derive from licensure to your ProQuest resources!

 

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: French Polynesia

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Flag of French Polynesia

Flag of French Polynesia

The new French Polynesia report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about French Polynesia:

  • The English word tattoo comes from the Tahitian word tatau. Tattoos are considered signs of beauty in Polynesian culture.
  • Many Tahitians have a box outside their homes (similar to a mailbox) for daily bread delivery.
  • Va’a is a traditional sport in which people race pirogues (canoes) between islands.
  • French Polynesia is an overseas country of France, meaning it is self-governing but remains under greater French rule.

Find out about popular the traditional Heiva Festival, read about common French Polynesian foods, and discover what life is like as a kid, all in this colorful new report.

#FeatureFriday: Editorial Cartoons in SIRS Discoverer

It’s #FeatureFriday! Learn about editorial cartoons in the Spotlight On… feature of SIRS Discoverer.

The origins of editorial cartoons date back to the eighteenth century. By the mid-nineteenth century, several magazines such as Punch and Harper’s Weekly were publishing editorial and political cartoons. It was during this time that Thomas Nast,  known as the “Father of the American Cartoon,” popularized editorial cartoons with his take-down of corrupt politicians–particularly “Boss” Tweed. Nast is also known for his creation of the Republican Elephant and Democratic Donkey.

"Boss" Tweed as illustrated by Thomas Nast.

“Boss” Tweed as illustrated by Thomas Nast
[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Visual Literacy and Common Core Standards

Several forms of literary and visual devices such as exaggeration, personification, symbolism, irony, satire and caricature are often used in editorial cartoons. Because of this, editorial cartoons support dynamic classroom lessons in Visual Literacy. Cartoons invite students to think critically and analyze what they see in the images. Such cartoons also provided an excellent opportunity to evaluate bias and point of view as most cartoonists illustrate their beliefs towards their subjects.

Find Editorial Cartoons on SIRS Discoverer

Editorial and political cartoons are featured throughout SIRS Discoverer on a wide variety of topics. Cartoons are editorially selected from prize-winning and reliable sources. These cartoons can be located through a Subject Heading search and a Subject Tree search. In addition to these searches, a cartoon can be found within the In the News feature (located in the Spotlight On…) where at the beginning of each month, SIRS editors hand-select an editorial cartoon that focuses on a news event. Students are then invited to answer a question based on the featured text and cartoon.

ProQuest SIRS Discoverer: In the News

ProQuest SIRS Discoverer: In the News

Want to know even more about the editorial cartoons? Patrick Chappatte is the cartoonist who is often featured within SIRS Discoverer. Take a look at his TED Talk where he discusses the power of cartoons.

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Equatorial Guinea

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

640px-flag_of_equatorial_guinea-svg

Flag of Equatorial Guinea

The new Equatorial Guinea report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about Equatorial Guinea:

  • In the Fang culture, many pregnant women take herbal baths to protect themselves from evil spirits.
  • Equatorial Guinea is the only country in Africa with Spanish as an official language.
  • When Portuguese explorers first found the island of Bioko, they named it Formosa, which means “beautiful.”
  • The islands of Bioko and Annobón are actually located closer to other countries like Cameroon and São Tomé and Príncipe than they are to Equatorial Guinea’s mainland.

Find out about popular foods and snacks in Equatorial Guinea, read about Bonko Dancers, and discover what life is like as a kid, all in this colorful new report.

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Niue

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Flag of Niue via CultureGrams

Flag of Niue via CultureGrams

The new Niue (pronounced “new-eh”) report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some fascinating Did You Knows about Niue:

  • A popular name for Niue is Rock of Polynesia.
  • There are no rivers or streams on Niue.
  • One traditional Niuean myth tells the story of the island being created when it was fished out of the sea with a hook by the Polynesian god Maui.
  • Coconut cream is an important ingredient in traditional Niuean cooking.

 

Find out about cooking in an underground oven, read about the traditional Niuean takalo (war dances), and discover what life is like as a kid, all in this colorful new report.

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Faroe Islands

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Faroe Islands Kids Edition Report

Faroe Islands Kids Edition Report

The new Faroe Islands report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some fascinating Did You Knows about the Faroe Islands:

  • There are around 10 times as many puffins as there are people in the Faroe Islands.
  • There are only three traffic lights in the Faroe Islands.
  • Many Faroese homes have traditional grass rooftops, which are safer than bricks in a storm.
  • None of the trees in the Faroe Islands are native to the islands. They have all been imported (brought from other countries) from Alaska and Tierra del Fuego.

Find out about the tradtional Faroese food skerpikjøt, read about the favorite holiday Shrove Monday, and discover what life is like as a kid, all in this colorful new report.