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Posts Tagged ‘Hillary Clinton’

SIRS Discoverer: Presidential Election for Kids

presidential election

Image via pixabay [CC0 Public Domain]

As we all know, this year’s presidential election has been highly contentious and at times “not suitable for children.” However, it is important for young students to be aware and involved with the election process. So how should teachers handle what is happening with the election?

Teaching Seventh Graders in a ‘Total Mess’ of an Election Season (New York Times) discusses how 7th-grade teachers are facing the challenges of how to handle election discussions in their classroom.

Teachers Use Nasty Election to Spark Polite Student Debate (AP) showcases how teachers are using the election to encourage critical thinking and research skills and suggests some ideas for your students:

–Analyze a newspaper article on the election and write two to three paragraphs about it.

–Take a 30-minute walk around the neighborhood, tally Clinton and Trump yard signs and write two to three paragraphs about why the student thinks people in the community might support one candidate over the other.

–Interview five people about who they are voting for and write about why they support a particular candidate.

Still need creative ideas for examining the elections is your classroom? Since the articles and images on SIRS Discoverer are hand-picked by editors you will find content that is age-appropriate for your students. Here are some subject searches to get you started:

Clinton, Hillary Rodham

Trump, Donald

Election 2016

Presidential candidates

96 Years After the 19th Amendment, the First Female Presidential Candidate

“When my mother was born, women did not have the right to vote, so we’ve come,
in really just a few generations, having to fight for the right to vote
to finally a potential woman head of state.”
–Democratic Presidential Nominee Hillary Clinton

Women Marching in 1913 Suffragette Parade, Washington, DC [public domain] via National Archives and Records Administration

Women Marching in 1913 Suffragette Parade, Washington, DC
[public domain] via National Archives and Records Administration

The first efforts to achieve women’s suffrage began before the Civil War. In 1848, a group of over 300 men and women gathered in Seneca Falls, New York to hold the first women’s rights convention. It took more than 70 years for American women to eventually gain that right.

Passed by Congress on June 4, 1919, the 19th Amendment guarantees all American women the right to vote. Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the amendment on August 18, 1920. On August 26, it was formally adopted into the Constitution by proclamation of Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby.

Though women finally achieved the right to vote, their struggle for equal representation in government has continued, and today they are still largely underrepresented in elected offices all across the nation. It took almost a full century for the first woman to be nominated for the office of president by a major political party, when Hillary Rodham Clinton secured the Democratic party’s nomination this year.

Below are a few more firsts by American women in government and politics:

Rankin, Jeanette. Rep. from Montana, 1917-1919. Leaving White House [public domain] via Library of Congress

Rankin, Jeanette. Rep. from Montana, 1917-1919. Leaving White House
[public domain] via Library of Congress

1887: Susanna Medora Salter became the first woman elected mayor of an American town, in Argonia, Kansas.

1916: Montana Republican Jeannette Rankin carries the distinction of being the first woman elected to the U.S. Congress.

1924: Nellie Tayloe Ross of Wyoming became the Nation’s first female governor when she was elected to succeed her deceased husband, William Bradford Ross.

1932: Hattie Wyatt Caraway of Arkansas is the first woman elected to the U.S. Senate.

1933: Frances Perkins is appointed secretary of labor by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, making her the first woman to serve as a member of a U.S. presidential cabinet.

1964: Senator Margaret Chase Smith from Maine becomes the first woman formally nominated for president of the United States by a major political party, at the Republican National Convention in San Francisco.

Sandra Day O'Connor Being Sworn in As Supreme Court Justice by Chief Justice Warren Burger, Her Husband John O'Connor Looks On [public domain] via National Archives and Records Administration

Sandra Day O’Connor Being Sworn in As Supreme Court Justice by Chief Justice Warren Burger, Her Husband John O’Connor Looks On
[public domain] via National Archives and Records Administration

1981: Sandra Day O’Connor is appointed by President Ronald Reagan to the Supreme Court, making her its first woman justice.

1984: Democrat Geraldine Ferraro is the first woman nominated for vice-president on a major party ticket.

1993: Dr. Sheila E. Widnall was the first woman to head a branch of the U.S. military as Secretary of the Air Force. The first female U.S. attorney general, Janet Reno was confirmed 98-0 by the U.S. Senate.

1997: Madeleine Albright https://www.britannica.com/biography/Madeleine-Albright is sworn in as the first female U.S. secretary of state.

2007: Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is the first woman to be elected Speaker of the House of Representatives.

Hillary Rodham Clinton at 2016 Democratic National Convention By JefParker (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0] via Wikimedia Commons

Hillary Rodham Clinton at 2016 Democratic National Convention
By JefParker (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0] via Wikimedia Commons

According to the World Economic Forum, 63 of 142 countries in the world have had a female leader at some point in the past 50 years, but the United States has never had one in its 240-year history. Why has it taken so long? And will 2016 finally be the year? We’ll find out on November 8!

The General Election Begins

eLibrary continues to follow the election with frequent updates of its U.S. Presidential Election, 2016 Research Topic page. Currently, the page has a recap of the conventions and Research Topic profiles of the candidates and their running mates. It also includes the profiles of third-party candidacies of Libertarian Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein. The page also has a section with up-to-date polling articles, including a link to the aggregate polling website RealClear Politics, a section on campaign issues and political analysis, and a section on campaign finance and influence. As the debates unfold, we will provide analytical articles of the debates from different viewpoints, along with continued updates of the polls before and after the debates.

Below are more Research Topic resources for your research and discovery: