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Posts Tagged ‘Gay Rights’

The Stonewall Riots and the Birth of Gay Liberation

Stonewall Inn, Greenwich Village, New York City, 2011 [Credit: InSapphoWeTrust from Los Angeles, California, USA, Creative Commons Attribution – Share Alike Generic 2.0 license] [via Wikimedia Commons]

Peace, love, and condemnation

We generally consider the 1960s in the United States as an era of peace and love. But the homosexual communities during this decade were commonly condemned by mainstream society.

Homosexuality was still classified as a “mental disorder” by the American Psychiatric Association. Police raids were conducted in establishments known to be “gay-friendly.” Homosexual acts were illegal, and many people were arrested for engaging in them. Some were fined; others were sentenced to long prison terms–even lifetime sentences. There were not many places where a gay man or woman could be open about their sexuality. Countless lesbians and gays lived “in the closet,” an existence in which they could not express their true selves.

The year was 1969

Stonewall Inn, Greenwich Village, 2011 [Credit: InSapphoWeTrust from Los Angeles, California, USA, Creative Commons Attribution - Share Alike Generic 2.0 license], [via Wikimedia Commons]

Stonewall Inn, site of the 1969 Stonewall riots, New York City [Credit: InSapphoWeTrust from Los Angeles, California, USA, CC BY-SA 3.0] [via Wikimedia Commons]

During the 1960s, New York City was home to the largest gay population in the country. The city was also considered to be one of the most aggressive against this alternative culture.

As the night of June 27 turned to June 28, in the year 1969, the New York City police conducted what they thought would be a routine raid at the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in Greenwich Village. Previous raids always resulted in arrests and not much opposition from the bar’s patrons.

Not on this night.

On this 1969 summer night, the gay liberation movement was born.

Out of the melee, pride emerges

In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, gay patrons, regularly harassed by the New York City police, took a stand. Word of the demonstration spread and many joined the riot at the Stonewall Inn. Protests broke out throughout the city. They continued for days, despite police attempts to control the crowds. Shouts of “gay power” and singing of “We Shall Overcome” rang through the streets.

The Stonewall riots inspired local and national dialogue about gay civil rights. Very soon after the riots, a gay advocacy group in NYC was formed and a newspaper was launched. In commemoration of the first anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, the first gay pride parades were held in Greenwich Village, Chicago, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. Two years after the riots, nearly every major U.S. city had established a gay-rights organization. And in 1973, the American Psychiatric Association removed homosexuality from its list of mental illnesses.

Nearly five decades later…

Forty-seven years after the Stonewall riots, the gay liberation movement has evolved to encompass the civil rights for lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender people. Incredible strides have been made in the LGBT movement:

In 2000, Vermont became the first U.S. state to legalize civil unions between same-sex couples; four years later, Massachusetts was the first to legalize gay marriage. A June 2015 Supreme Court decision legalized same-sex marriage in all states, a huge victory for the LGBT movement.

What constituted a hate crime in the United States was expanded in 2009 to include crimes motivated by the victim’s gender, sexual orientation or identity or disability. 

In 2011, the Obama administration addressed the United Nations and announced that LGBT rights are “one of the remaining human rights challenges of our time” and that the country would support international efforts promoting LGBT rights.

Transgender rights  became a mainstream issue after the turn of the century and quickly picked up momentum. By 2013, two major federal rulings advanced equal opportunity employment for transgender people. The year 2013 also heralded further progress in the struggle for transgender rights: California enacted the first U.S. law protecting transgender students, and the American Psychiatric Association eliminated its diagnosis “gender identity disorder.”

June is Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month, otherwise known as LGBT Pride Month. It was established in honor of the 1969 Stonewall Riots. It is a time of celebration, commemoration, and remembrance: a celebration of living freely, openly, and honestly; a commemoration of all that the LGBT community has contributed and what the LGBT rights movement has accomplished; and a remembrance of members of the LGBT community who lost their lives to hate crimes or HIV/AIDS.

Join SKS and its June Spotlight of the Month in honoring LGBT Pride Month. Learn about the history of the gay rights movement and follow its path as it is forged in the United States and many countries around the world.

“The Stonewall riot may have been the start of a civil rights movement, but it was not the beginning of our history.” ― Tom Cardamone, author, and activist

3 Trending Leading Issues: Supreme Court Edition

U.S. Supreme Court Building, Washington, DC <br />  By Daderot (Own work) [Public domain], <a href="http://commons.wikimedia.org

U.S. Supreme Court Building, Washington, DC
By Daderot (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Debates on several Leading Issues are about to heat up. Over the next few weeks, the Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is expected to rule on several landmark cases addressing some of the most controversial issues of our day. Public awareness of SCOTUS may be limited, but these rulings will affect the rights of all Americans. These rulings are also likely to affect SCOTUS’s favorability, which has declined in recent years.

Here are three of the most talked about Leading Issues that SCOTUS will address in the coming weeks:

1. Health Care Reform

SIRS Leading Issue: Health Care Reform by ProQuest LLC via ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

SIRS Leading Issue: Health Care Reform
by ProQuest LLC via ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

King v. Burwell. This case addresses subsidies offered by the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The plaintiffs argue that the ACA only allows subsidies for health insurance purchased through state-run exchanges. The defendants argue that the ACA was intended to offer subsidies for health insurance purchased through federal- and state-run exchanges. According to the New York Times, if SCOTUS rules in favor of the plaintiffs, “about 7.5 million people could lose their subsidies in 34 states that use the federal health care marketplace.”

2. Same-Sex Marriage

SIRS Leading Issue: Same-Sex Marriage <br> by ProQuest LLC via ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

SIRS Leading Issue: Same-Sex Marriage
by ProQuest LLC via ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

Obergefell v. Hodges. This case addresses same-sex marriage. SCOTUS has raised two questions: Does the U.S. Constitution grant same-sex couples the right to marry? Should states without legalized same-sex marriage be required to recognize same-sex marriages obtained lawfully in other states? A ruling in favor of the plaintiffs could potentially legalize same-sex marriage in all fifty states.

3. Capital Punishment

SIRS Leading Issue: Capital Punishment <br> by ProQuest LLC via ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

SIRS Leading Issue: Capital Punishment
by ProQuest LLC via ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

Glossip v. Gross. This death penalty case addresses whether a controversial lethal-drug combination used to carry out executions violates the Eighth Amendment’s prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment. The plaintiffs argue that the sedative midazolam, the first drug administered in the three-drug series, fails to prevent prisoners from enduring the intense pain caused by the two other drugs. This severe pain, they argue, is cruel and unusual punishment. If SCOTUS rules in favor of the plaintiffs, states that use midazolam will have to find more reliable drugs or turn to other execution methods like firing squads.

ProQuest’s SIRS Issues Researcher and SIRS Government Reporter editors will follow all of the Supreme Court rulings in the coming weeks. Stay tuned.

What do you think about these Supreme Court cases? Comment below or Tweet us at #ProQuest.

SIRS Leading Issues Promote Global Cultural Literacy

Your students may all want to move to France after reading this article about proposed legislation that would eliminate homework for French primary school pupils!

SIRS Issues Researcher’s Leading Issues allow users to explore global perspectives on scores of diverse topics like Abortion, Education Policy, Elections, Gay Rights, Health Care, Immigration and more. In our rapidly changing and shrinking world, the need for improved global education is increasingly apparent. SIRS Issues Researcher’s editors review and select articles from more than 375 international publications. Access these international viewpoints by selecting the Global Impact icon under Research Tools for each Leading Issue.

The article results list can then be sorted by relevance, date, or lexile score, or users can view the three editorially-selected feature articles at the top of the page…and maybe start planning that move to France.

Au Revoir!