Flower

Posts Tagged ‘Earth Day’

5 Ways to Celebrate Earth Day with Your Students

Young students are curious about Earth and discovering ways that they can help the planet. As adults, it’s our responsibility to teach them how and inspire their ideas. Classrooms and media centers are ideal places for this type of learning and exploration. And Earth Day, which is April 22, is the perfect time!

SIRS Discoverer and its April Spotlight of the Month on Earth Day can assist in planning for this significant global holiday. Founded in 1970, Earth Day began and continues as a day of environmental education and action.

In honor of our Earth, here are some activities that promote awareness and appreciation of nature, recycling, and the environment:

1. Plant a garden and compost.

An outdoor garden is a great classroom. Gardens can help students develop listening, comprehension, and collaboration skills, as well as provide a solid foundation in Earth sciences. Try an activity that helps students understand the parts of a plant and how they grow. The printable PDF version of the associated Teacher’s Guide provides information, photos, and activities. You can help your students dig deeper and understand more about plant growth with this article and associated activities on composting.

2. Recycle and reuse.

Tell your students to pay attention to the amount of paper and plastic bottles they use. Guide them to reuse and recycle such items appropriately. For some hands-on learning, your students can learn the art of recycling with this activity, which provides age-appropriate ideas and instructions for recycling newspapers into papier-mache, collages, or weavings. Or, impress them with the power of nature, and show them great ways people are using wind, water, and sunlight to generate “clean energy.”

3. Write letters to local representatives and start petitions.

Much of environmental protection is done through laws and legislation. As a lesson in civics, organize a student letter writing campaign to a local or state representative. Allow your students to vocalize their beliefs on how the planet should be treated. Another idea is to sign or start a petition for climate change and clean energy.

4. Walk and bike. Don’t drive.

Fossil fuels contribute to many environmental problems. Because it can be done on a small scale, encourage your students to use their bodies as a form of green transportation. Plus it’s great exercise!

5. Learn about coral reefs and other worldwide environmental issues.

We can also help the Earth–and help young students help the Earth–by learning about what is happening around the globe, from the deteriorating condition of our oceans’ coral reefs, which can lead to discussions about the warming of our planet, to the destructive and growing Great Pacific Garbage Patch, which emphasizes the necessity of recycling and limiting our use of plastics.

Celebrate life on Earth, and Earth itself, this Earth Day. If it is important to you, it will be important to the children you reach!

Subscribe via email to Share This and never miss a post.

Celebrate Earth Day on April 22nd

Earth as Seen from Space via Flickr [Public Domain]

Earth as Seen from Space via Flickr [Public Domain]

Earth Day rolls around every year on April 22nd, but why can’t we celebrate Earth Day every day! Small changes can make a big difference, such as picking up trash, never littering, and planting trees. These things and many others help to make our earth a cleaner and better place to live.

Earth Day started 46 years ago, on April 22, 1970. It began as an environmental movement to make world leaders aware of issues such as climate change, pollution, deforestation, endangered animals, and more. With millions of people wanting to help better the environment, “the first Earth Day had led to the creation of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts.

This year, Earth Day Network is promoting the “Trees for the Earth” event. The goal is to plant 7.8 billion trees around the world by the year 2020. That year will represent the 50th anniversary of Earth Day.

Many places around the world celebrate Earth Day each year with festivals, clean-up events, and other types of celebrations. These events help bring awareness of many environmental issues. This year, find a way you can contribute to cleaning up the earth and make every day Earth Day!

Teachers, direct your students to ProQuest SIRS Discoverer to learn more about Earth Day and the environment. Here are some links to get you started on your search:

Earth Day

Environmentalism

Environmental Protection

Earth Day Activity: The 2 Minute Clean

See Rubbish? Pick It Up!

Most people want a cleaner planet. But many of us feel powerless: How can one person make a difference? The world’s seven billion people create a lot of trash. Unfortunately, much of that trash ends up in our oceans.

According to a report in the February 13, 2015, issue of Science Magazine, an estimated 8.8 million tons of plastic is dumped into our oceans annually. Plastic debris harms marine life. Sea creatures are at risk of becoming entangled in plastic, which can cause lacerations, exhaustion, and drownings. Additionally, plastic is not biodegradable; it breaks into smaller and smaller pieces, which may never fully decompose. Even worse, these small bits of plastic become part of our food chain. Sea creatures like fish mistake these plastic bits for food. Humans, in turn, risk consuming contaminated seafood.

These are sobering facts, but there is hope. In 2014 Martin Dorey founded the Two Minute Beach Clean to inspire people around the world to spend two minutes picking up debris from beaches. The crux of his campaign is that seemingly insignificant efforts to clean up the environment can have a major impact. Imagine the amount of litter we could clean up if we all took two minutes out of our busy days.

Trash litters Fort Lauderdale Beach in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, following a day of spring break partying on March 12, 2015. Cleaning crews picked up the trash shortly after this picture was taken. <br />  (Credit: Victor Bullen)

Trash litters Fort Lauderdale Beach following a day of spring break partying in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on March 12, 2015. Cleaning crews pick up the trash around sundown.
(Credit: Victor Bullen)

I propose expanding the Two Minute Beach Clean to all outdoor spaces. Many of us do not live near a beach, but most of us live near waterways. Why not pick up trash found along lakes and rivers? No waterways nearby? Pick up trash at your local park or in your neighborhood. Don’t have two minutes? No problem. How about the Two Second Clean? It only takes two seconds to pick up that Styrofoam cup you see while walking your dog.

We all have the power to help the environment. Small steps like picking up trash (or not littering in the first place) can go a long way. It may not solve our environmental problems overnight, but that doesn’t mean it won’t help.

Happy Earth Day!

Tell us about your #EarthDay projects in the comments below or @ProQuest.

Share Earth Day with Your Students

Children, Teacher Gazing at Globe <br \> U.S. Department of Education, via ProQuest SIRS Government Reporter [Public Domain]

Children, Teacher Gazing at Globe
U.S. Department of Education via ProQuest SIRS Government Reporter [Public Domain]

Young students love learning about Earth and discovering ways that they can help the planet. As adults, it’s our responsibility to teach them ways and encourage their ideas. The classroom is an ideal place for this type of learning and exploration. And Earth Day, which is April 22, is the perfect time!

SIRS Discoverer, and its April Spotlight of the Month on Earth Day, can assist in planning for this significant global holiday. Founded in 1970, Earth Day began and continues as a day of environmental education and action. In honor of our Earth, plan activities that promote awareness and appreciation of nature, recycling, and the environment.

An outdoor garden is a great classroom. Lessons that occur there can help students develop listening, comprehension, and collaboration skills, as well as providing a solid foundation in Earth sciences.

Try an activity that helps students understand the parts of a plant and how they grow. The printable PDF version of the associated Teacher’s Guide provides information, photos, and activities. You can help your students dig deeper and understand more about plant growth with this article and associated activities on composting.

Your students can learn the art of recycling–literally–with this activity, which provides age-appropriate ideas and instructions for recycling newspapers into papier-mache, collages, or weavings. Or, impress them with the power of nature, and show them great ways people are using wind, water, and sunlight to generate “clean energy.” A diagram, quiz, and activity are provided.

We can also help the Earth–and help young students help the Earth–by learning about what is happening around the globe, from the deteriorating condition of our oceans’ coral reefs , which can lead to discussions about the warming of our planet, to the destructive and growing Great Pacific Garbage Patch, which emphasizes the necessity of recycling and limiting our use of plastics.

SIRS Discoverer’s Animal Facts feature is a wonderful way to introduce students to the many amazing creatures of our planet. Some are endangered, like the Asian elephant; yet some have recovered from the brink of extinction, like the Galapagos tortoise. Why are some animal populations struggling? How can we help the diversity of Earth’s life thrive?

Celebrate life on Earth, and Earth itself, this Earth Day. If it is important to you, it will be important to the children you reach!

Earth Day History

For more than four decades, people in the United States have marked April 22 as Earth Day, which celebrates the planet and promotes environmental protection. Since 1990, it has been a global event that is said to be the largest secular holiday in the world, with more than a billion observers.

Birth

What is today known as Earth Day was founded in 1970 by U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson. The stirrings of the ecology movement had begun in the 1960s, largely due to theEarth Day 1970 in New York City publication of “Silent Spring,” Rachel Carson’s 1962 book about the environmental impacts of the pesticide DDT. Seizing upon the tactics of the anti-Vietnam War movement, Nelson hoped to use public demonstrations to bring environmental issues to the national attention and into the political arena. The date of April 22 was chosen in order to maximize the participation of college students in what Nelson termed “teach-ins,” and, with the help of national coordinator Denis Hayes, Earth Day events involving 20 million people were organized across the country.

Going Global

Over the years, Earth Day continued to grow, and in 1990, Hayes was tapped to organize the 20th-year event, which took Earth Day global to 200 million people in 141 countries. At the 30-year mark, Hayes led the push for awareness about global warming and clean energy in an Earth Day that reached 184 countries. On Earth Day 2010, around quarter of a million people gathered at the National Mall in Washington DC for a Climate Rally.

Legacy

As a result of his environmental efforts and founding of Earth Day, Gaylord Nelson was presented with the National Medal of Freedom by President Bill Clinton in 1995. His creation, which now is said to reach a billion people in more than 192 nations, is widely credited with leading to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency and the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act. While some over the years have wrestled with what Earth Day is, what it should be and what its impact is, there is no doubt that it has struck a nerve with people across the globe and has helped bring environmental awareness to the mainstream.

Follow the links above and below to see some of eLibrary’s resources related to this topic and others, but don’t stop there. Use eLibrary’s Basic and Advanced search tools, Topic browse and Research Topics browse to find much more.

Research Topics:

Earth Day Research Topic

Earth Day Research Topic

Environmentalism, Pollution, Air Pollution, Water Pollution, Projects & Experiments: Ecology, Religion and the Environment

Topic Browse sections:

Ecology, Pollution

Discoverer Spotlight: Celebrate Earth Day

Earth from Space <br \> by NASA, via ProQuest SIRS Discoverer [Public Domain]

Earth from Space
by NASA, via ProQuest SIRS Discoverer [Public Domain]

The Earth is home to us all. We walk her surface, eat food from her soil, drink water from her rivers, and breathe air from her atmosphere. We should thank her every day by reusing, reducing, and recycling the natural resources she provides. We need to take care of our Earth! On April 22, more than one billion people in 190 countries will observe Earth Day. It’s a great time to learn about our planet and ways to protect it. You can celebrate Earth Day by participating in parades and other gatherings, planting and saving trees, or cleaning up beaches. Most importantly, remember to make a promise to help the environment by recycling, growing a garden, creating a compost bin, saving energy, conserving water and respecting biodiversity. Learn more about Earth Day and ways to help our planet in April’s Spotlight of the Month.