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Posts Tagged ‘2016 election’

SIRS Discoverer: Presidential Election for Kids

presidential election

Image via pixabay [CC0 Public Domain]

As we all know, this year’s presidential election has been highly contentious and at times “not suitable for children.” However, it is important for young students to be aware and involved with the election process. So how should teachers handle what is happening with the election?

Teaching Seventh Graders in a ‘Total Mess’ of an Election Season (New York Times) discusses how 7th-grade teachers are facing the challenges of how to handle election discussions in their classroom.

Teachers Use Nasty Election to Spark Polite Student Debate (AP) showcases how teachers are using the election to encourage critical thinking and research skills and suggests some ideas for your students:

–Analyze a newspaper article on the election and write two to three paragraphs about it.

–Take a 30-minute walk around the neighborhood, tally Clinton and Trump yard signs and write two to three paragraphs about why the student thinks people in the community might support one candidate over the other.

–Interview five people about who they are voting for and write about why they support a particular candidate.

Still need creative ideas for examining the elections is your classroom? Since the articles and images on SIRS Discoverer are hand-picked by editors you will find content that is age-appropriate for your students. Here are some subject searches to get you started:

Clinton, Hillary Rodham

Trump, Donald

Election 2016

Presidential candidates

2016 Election Issue: Immigration Reform

Immigration is a key issue in the 2016 presidential campaign. Opinions differ on how to secure our border with Mexico, on whether to grant amnesty to illegal immigrants already in our country, on how to handle the Syrian refugee crisis, and on whether or not to temporarily ban Muslim immigrants.

ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher can help students gain a better understanding of issues surrounding immigration with the Immigration Leading Issue. Our editorially-selected articles and graphics provide differing viewpoints on such questions as: Is the anti-immigrant movement racist?, Should migrants and refugees be forced to assimilate into their new country?, Is enhanced border security the best solution for human smuggling?, Should immigrants who are in the country illegally be allowed to remain in the U.S.?, Is employing immigrants who are in the country illegally beneficial to the U.S. economy?, and more.

The Immigration Timeline provides a comprehensive chronicle of events and legislation concerning immigration throughout the history of the U.S., with links to articles, images, and primary source documents that enable students to gain a deeper understanding of how our country evolved.

Photograph from Ellis Island, New York

This photograph from the 1920s shows immigrants being physically examined by inspectors at Ellis Island, New York. Ellis Island was one of the main gateways through which immigrants passed in order to begin their new lives in America. National Archives [public domain] via ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

While students may know that our nation was built by immigrants, they may be surprised to learn that anti-immigration feelings pervaded much of our history and were so widespread in the early 20th century that there was even a popular song expressing the sentiment of the time: “O! Close the Gates”. Newspaper articles from this time period, which can be found by searching Primary Sources, also provide a first-hand account of public opinion at the time (Coolidge Proclaims Immigrant Quotas, Intelligence of Our Immigrants).

Encourage your students to use ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher to not only understand the current debate on Election 2016 issues but also to explore the issues from a historical perspective.

 

New in Researcher: Election 2016 Leading Issue!

Just in time for election season, ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher’s Election 2016 Leading Issue will help your students gain an understanding of the latest race for the White House.

Campaign Fund-Raising Arms Race

Nearly $400 million has been raised during the first half of 2015, and next year’s presidential contest is expected to cost up to $5 billion, which would make this election the most expensive on record. Rather than going directly into the campaigns, most of the money is flowing into super PACs and other outside groups that are allowed to raise unlimited amounts of money from wealthy individuals, corporations and labor unions. According to a New York Times analysis of Federal Election Commission reports and Internal Revenue Service records, there are less than four hundred families responsible for almost half the money raised so far in the 2016 presidential election.

With so much money being raised by so few people, our Election 2016 Essential Question poses the question — Will the super-rich buy the 2016 election? Editorially-selected yes/no viewpoint articles are provided to help students critically assess the issue and come up with their own answer.

How would you answer our Election 2016 Essential Question?

(If you can’t see the poll below in your browser, click on Playbuzz.)

[playbuzz-item url=”//www.playbuzz.com/amyshaw10/election-2016-can-the-white-house-be-bought”]

Tell Us What You Think

What other issues are of importance to you and your students in this election? Let us know in the comments section below or tweet us at #ProQuest.