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Archive for the ‘SIRS Issues Researcher Updates’ Category

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Leading Issues in the News: Police and Body Cameras

Civil rights activists have long called for police officers to wear body cameras. But recently, after seemingly endless incidents of conflicts between police and citizens–many that led to the deaths of unarmed black men and were recorded on bystanders’ cell phone videos–more cities are implementing the use of body-worn cameras for their law enforcement personnel. About a third of the nation’s 18,000 police agencies are now either testing body cameras or have embraced them to record their officers’ interactions with the public.

Police Officer with Body-Worn Camera via Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS)/U.S. Department of Justice [public domain]

Police Officer with Body-Worn Camera
via Office of Community Oriented Policing Services/U.S. Department of Justice
[public domain]

Researchers from the University of Cambridge’s Institute of Criminology published the first full scientific study of the experiment they conducted on policing with body-worn-cameras in Rialto, California in 2012. The experiment showed that evidence capture is just one output of body-worn video, and the technology is perhaps most effective at actually preventing escalation during police-public interactions: whether that is attacks on or abuse of police officers, or unnecessary use of force by law enforcement. The study found that when the officers wore body cameras, public complaints against police were down 88% compared with the previous 12 months, while the officers’ use of force fell by 60%.

While the hope is that the cameras will increase transparency, accountability and boost police-community relations, their widespread use has also raised concerns about the privacy of people caught in body camera footage. There are also important questions about public access, review, storage, tampering and disciplinary action for officers who don’t use the devices properly. The cameras are also expensive. They can range in price from $300 to $800 per officer, and monthly video storage costs can cost hundreds of thousands more. In September, the Justice Department announced $23 million in grants for a pilot program to help agencies in 32 states to expand the use of body-worn cameras and explore their impact.

Should police officers be required to use body cameras?

This is the Essential Question explored in a recent addition to SIRS Issues Researcher’s list of over 345 Leading Issues: Police and Body Cameras.

Screen Cap from SIRS Issues Researcher

Screen Cap from SIRS Issues Researcher

For all Leading Issues, SIRS Editors create an engaging Essential Question, a summary for context, viewpoint statements, plus supporting articles to help build solid foundations for understanding the issues. Thousands of hand-selected, highly targeted newspaper and magazine articles, graphics, charts, maps, primary sources, government documents, websites, multimedia, as well as critical thinking questions, and timelines help broaden student comprehension of each topic. A Research Guide is offered to help guide each student through their assignment step by step.

Educators, direct your students to the new and updated SIRS Issues Researcher to dig deeper into the topic of Police and Body Cameras. Or they can explore these related issues:

Leading Issues in the News: Concussions in Sports

“I demand that football change its rules or be abolished. Brutality and foul play should receive the same summary punishment given to a man who cheats at cards! Change the game or forsake it!”

–President Theodore Roosevelt, after the Chicago Tribune reported that 18 college football players had died and 159 were seriously injured during the 1905 season

The escalating violence and the number of injuries and deaths in the early history of American football led to rule changes and equipment improvements aimed at making the game safer, both at the collegiate and professional levels. However, football players—as well as athletes in other sports—continue to put themselves at risk of injury every time they participate in a practice or game.

In the past couple decades the risks associated with repetitive head injuries have come to the forefront. Mike Webster, a Hall of Famer who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers from 1974 to 1990, became the first former NFL player to be diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)–a progressive degenerative brain disease–after his death at the age of 50 in 2002. The release in 2015 of the movie “Concussion”, which chronicled the work of forensic pathologist Bennet Omalu, who performed autopsies on former NFL players, put the public spotlight directly on this serious issue.

A recent addition to SIRS Issues Researcher’s list of over 340 Leading Issues—Concussions in Sports—is one that any student who participates in sports—as an athlete and/or fan—can relate to. It provides young researchers with an in-depth look at this problem that affects all athletes—from those participating in youth leagues to the professional athlete. The Concussions in Sports Timeline provides a history of the issue and a list of key events that have had an impact on past and current players, and highlights efforts to improve player safety and continue research on concussions and their effects.

 

Screen cap from SIRS Issues Researcher

Screen cap from SIRS Issues Researcher

 

SIRS Knowledge Source: New Interface & Google Integration!

Just in time for back to school, SIRS Knowledge Source is updated with a brand new interface and Google integration for SIRS Issues Researcher, SIRS Government Reporter, and SIRS Renaissance.

SIRS Issues Researcher


Explore the benefits:

  • A cleaner, more streamlined, and modern appearance
  • Design optimized for viewing on mobile devices as well as desktops (i.e. responsive design)
  • Focus on the most valued content and features
  • Integration with Google Drive and Google Classroom
  • Design aligned to other popular ProQuest products like CultureGrams and SIRS Discoverer
  • Continued access to all the great SIRS content

 

zika

See the 13 New Leading Issues out of 345+ added by our editorial team covering complex social topics:

  • Biological and Chemical Terrorism
  • Concealed Weapons
  • Concussions in Sports
  • Conflict Minerals
  • Education Reform
  • Executive Pay
  • Government Ethics
  • Indigenous Peoples
  • Islamic State Group (ISIS)
  • Refugees
  • Religion and Science
  • Religious Minorities
  • Zika

As evidenced by these tweets, educators are excited about the new integration between SIRS and Google Drive and Classroom!

SIRSKnowledgeSource-tweet

For more details about the interface update, visit the SIRS Issues Researcher support page.

Share the good news with your colleagues! Tweet about the new SIRS Knowledge Source @ProQuest.

6 Reasons Why Editorial Cartoons Are an Essential Teaching Tool

“One strong editorial cartoon is worth a hundred solemn editorials.”
—William Zinsser, On Writing Well

daily-paper-464015_1920

CC0 Public Domain, via Pixabay

My seventh-grade social studies teacher gave extra credit to students who brought in editorial cartoons for class discussions. Luckily for me, stacks of newspapers were common in my house. My father was a printing-press operator and a newspaper addict. We got three newspapers daily and sometimes more when my father couldn’t resist a newsstand. So I got a lot of extra credit that year.

Editorial cartoons are all that I remember from that class. My newspaper monopoly aside, I remember being captivated by grown-up cartoons and wanted to understand them, which is how I became interested in current events and issues. I still get excited when I see editorial cartoons. An astute cartoon is an oasis in a wit-starved world.

To celebrate our new Editorial Cartoons Curriculum Guide, here are six reasons why editorial cartoons are an enduring curriculum essential.

Why do you think editorial cartoons are an essential teaching tool?

Share your thoughts with us on Twitter #ProQuest or in the comments below.

ProQuest editors are continually adding editorial cartoons to ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher. Don’t have it? Request a trial.

Recording Offers Sneak Peek of New SIRS Issues Researcher

Sneak Peek Webinar

The SIRS Knowledge Source portal, including the SIRS Issues Researcher product, is getting a makeover! The new interface moves forward our ongoing efforts to unify the research experience across all of the SIRS products.

Learn all the details on this recorded webinar from Product Manager Larry Wilkner on what you can expect from the new design including:

SIRS Issues Researcher Preview

Mobile-Friendly:
The new design is intuitive and easy to navigate on any device, from Chromebooks to smartphones.

Improved Homepage and Leading Issues:
The fresh, clean interface includes Essential Questions to frame each issue, overview for background and context, viewpoints with supporting articles, and full results set for deeper research and analysis.

The Same Great Content:
One thing that isn’t changing is the comprehensive, editorially-selected content that sets SIRS apart.

Learn More

Comment at #ProQuest or let us know your feedback by commenting below.

Webinars Offer Sneak Peek at the New SIRS Issues Researcher

new

SIRS Issues Researcher is getting a makeover! 

Join host Larry Wilkner, Product Manager for ProQuest, to preview the new SIRS Issues Researcher user interface update that is coming August 2016!

Choose from three webinar sessions for your convenience.

Sign up by clicking on the date and time that work best for you. Learn all about the additional benefits to students, teachers and librarians, and have your questions answered by our expert.

All times are EST.

Tuesday, May 3, 2016
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Wednesday, May 4, 2016
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016
3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Learn in these webinars how the new interface moves forward our ongoing efforts to unify the research experience across all of the SIRS products.

How Do We Solve All These Problems?

digital media

Digital Media Leading Issue in SIRS Issues Researcher

Solving the world’s problems. That’s a very challenging task. There are so many variables and so many points of view. So many different interests to consider. But with critical examination of all the angles, and new ideas, nothing’s impossible! SIRS Issues Researcher has been helping guide the way through the world’s toughest issues for a very long time. Each year it gets better. Today it covers approximately 330 separate and sometimes related, but always sharply debated, issues. Coming soon, it will provide an all-new, exciting, and intuitive environment for elucidating young problem solvers in schools everywhere.  We’ll keep you posted on that.

Learn more about SIRS Issues Researcher today, or many of our other exceptional ProQuest resources, by joining one of our monthly public webinars.  If you don’t see the class you’re interested in, contact us , and we’ll be happy to arrange a meeting to discuss the resources you’re interested in learning!

Zika Virus Resources in ProQuest

Zika virus is an example of a vital current issue that is important for students to understand in our global society. Point your students to reliable, age-appropriate ProQuest resources to help them stay informed and critically think about global issues.

The Zika virus disease, according to the CDC, is caused by a Zika virus that is spread through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. Zika was first discovered in 1947 and named after the Zika forest in Uganda. In 1952, the first human cases were detected and outbreaks occurred in tropical Africa, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific Islands. In May 2015, the Pan American Health Organization issued an alert regarding a reported case of the Zika virus in Brazil and on February 1, 2016, the World Health Organization declared Zika a public health emergency of international concern.

There are 346 cases of Zika in the continental United States in people who had contracted the disease outside of the country. On April 11, 2016, public health officials used strong language to describe the Zika virus. Dr. Anne Schuchat, the principal deputy director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) stated, “Most of what we’ve learned is not reassuring….Everything we look at with this virus seems to be scarier that we initially thought.” Due to the outbreak threat in the United States, the Obama administration has lobbied Congress for $1.9 billion to combat the virus.

ProQuest offers comprehensive coverage of the Zika virus for students in elementary, middle, high school, and advanced grade levels:

eLibrary

eLibrary‘s editorially-created Research Topic frames the issue and helps students understand the Zika virus from all angles. The results list offers comprehensive coverage from such sources such as Nation’s Health, Life Science Weekly and includes scholarly journals like the American Journal of Public Health.

researchtopic

Zika Virus Research Topic via eLibrary

ProQuest Central

Thousands of results in ProQuest Central provide in-depth coverage including peer-reviewed articles.

proquestcentral

Search on ProQuest Central

SIRS Discoverer

Editor-selected articles on issues like the Zika Virus are covered in SIRS Discoverer‘s Current Events feature and appropriate for the elementary to middle school grade levels.

disco

Current Events Feature on SIRS Discoverer

SIRS Issues Researcher

Editors select comprehensive content on the Leading Issues of today in SIRS Issues Researcher that include updated articles, websites, and graphics that frame every issue.

researcher

Zika Virus Article on SIRS Issues Researcher

ProQuest editors work daily to curate relevant resources for your students. If you have any feedback or requests, let us know by contacting us or tweeting #ProQuest. If you don’t already have these resources, set up a trial.

Coming This Summer: The All-New SIRS Issues Researcher!

We are excited to announce upcoming enhancements to
SIRS Issues Researcher!

SIRS Issues Researcher Preview

The SIRS Knowledge Source portal, including the SIRS Issues Researcher product, is getting a makeover. The new interface moves forward our ongoing efforts to unify the research experience across all of the SIRS products. Here’s what you can expect from the new design:

Mobile-Friendly:
The new design is intuitive and easy to navigate on any device, from Chromebooks to smartphones.

Improved Homepage and Leading Issues:
The fresh, clean interface includes Essential Questions to frame each issue, overview for background and context, viewpoints with supporting articles, and full results set for deeper research and analysis.

The Same Great Content:
One thing that isn’t changing is the comprehensive, editorially-selected content that sets SIRS apart.

Learn More

Comment at #ProQuest or let us know your feedback by commenting below.

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