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Archive for the ‘CultureGrams Updates’ Category

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Palau

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Flag of Palau, via CultureGrams

The new Palau report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about Palau:

  • Palau includes around 250 islands, but only about 10 of them are inhabited.
  • Palau does not have a military force of its own. The United States is responsible for its defense under an agreement between the two countries.
  • Bachel are stone disks or beads with a hole carved in the middle. They were traditionally used as a form of money in Palau and are now passed between families for important events, such as funerals, weddings, or births.
  • Palau gained its independence in 1994.

Read about life as a kid in Palau, holiday celebrations, and typical meals, all in this colorful new report.

New Micronesia Interviews on CultureGrams

Images by: Karyn Sorenson [via CultureGrams Gallery]

Here at CultureGrams, we are continuously adding a variety of new and interesting content to our product. We most recently added two new interviews from The Federated States of Micronesia.

CultureGrams features a collection of over 400 interviews that reflect the experiences and perspectives of people from around the world. Be sure to keep an eye out for more new interviews coming this year!

Here are two excerpts from our newest CultureGrams interviews:

Wilika, age 17 from Chuuk, Micronesia

“Since I grew up here on my island, I love to eat local food made from what we grow on my island. One of my favorites is mashed taro, which looks like mashed potatoes except it is more reddish in color. Mashed taro is one of the main common dishes for people on my island, especially the older people. These are still the favorite for many people from my island who live in Guam, Hawaii, and the United States mainland. They always ask their family to bring these when they travel.”

 

Henry, age 50 from Weno, Micronesia

“There is a great difference for me as opposed to how my parents grew up on this island. The ways of life are completely different. The culture is slowly changing and there is greater mobility, as many people leave their homes and relocate to the city center, where they can find better employment opportunities, education, and health care. The way of life has slowly evolved, and some cultural traditions are breaking down. For example, the extended family, which was once highly regarded, is drifting apart as immediate families adopt more Western living styles. There is also more cultural integration as we pick up elements from the cultures we come into contact with.”

 

Find more interviews from countries all over the world in the CultureGrams Interviews gallery!

Don’t have CultureGrams? Request a free trial.

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Montserrat

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Flag of Montserrat, via CultureGrams

The new Montserrat report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about Montserrat:

  • Montserrat is one of the smallest island nations in the world. It covers just 39 square miles (101 square kilometers).
  • Goat water is the national dish of Montserrat. It is a goat meat stew cooked in a metal or tin pot over a wood fire and often served at weddings, funerals, and other special events.
  • The highest point on the island is the dome of the Soufrière Hills volcano. The volcano began erupting in 1995 and went on to destroy the southern half of the island, blanketing it in ash and making it uninhabitable.
  • English is the official language of Montserrat because the island was settled by Irish colonists in the 1600s.

Read about life as a kid in Montserrat, holiday celebrations, and the eruption of the Soufrière Hills volcano, all in this colorful new report.

CultureGrams: New Dominican Republic Interviews!

Boca Chica beach, Dominican Republic

Boca Chica beach, Dominican Republic [via CultureGrams Photo Gallery]

We’ve added three new interviews from the Dominican Republic to our CultureGrams Interviews collection! Each interview captures different viewpoints about life in the Dominican Republic from people of various ages living in the northern coastal city of Puerto Plata:

These interviews by country natives are not only interesting and fun to read, but they also give students insider knowledge into what life and culture in the country are really like.

Here’s an example from the interview with Alfonso, in which he describes what being a citizen of the Dominican Republic means to him:

AlfonsoBeing a citizen of the Dominican Republic means living in an amazing country. You get to enjoy the beautiful scenery, food, and people. The views are amazing. There is a little bit of everything for everyone. If you like the beach, there are amazing beaches all around the country. If you like the mountains, there are gorgeous peaks in the north and center of the island. If you like hot and dry, the south and west areas are just the right place for you. Also, the food is amazing. The seasoning and ingredients used in the variety of traditional dishes are amazing. Whether its eggs for breakfast or a five-course meal, it’s always amazing. And the people are amazing and kind—always happy and ready to have a good time. Being with Dominican people is never boring.

Find more interviews from countries all over the world in the CultureGrams Interviews gallery!

Don’t have CultureGrams? Request a free trial.

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Tuvalu

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Flag of Tuvalu, via CultureGrams

The new Tuvalu report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about Tuvalu:

  • Tuvalu (pronounced too-VAH-loo) means “eight standing together” in Tuvaluan. This refers to the nation’s eight traditionally inhabited atolls (ring-shaped reefs) and islands.
  • The only mammal native to Tuvalu is the Polynesian rat, though early settlers brought pigs, chickens, dogs, and cats with them. However, there are hundreds of species of fish and other marine creatures.
  • There are no rivers or streams in Tuvalu, since the islands are made up of coral gravel and sand. People must catch and store rainwater or desalinate (remove the salt from) ocean water.
  • Tuvalu owns the internet domain name .tv, which is a popular alternative to .com for companies worldwide.

Read about life as a kid in Tuvalu, traditional games, and the importance of family relationships, all in this colorful new report.

New Burkina Faso Photos and Slideshows Added!

We’ve recently added new media to our Burkina Faso country report, including more than 35 gallery photos and 5 new slideshows. Come have a look! CultureGrams has over 20,000 photos across its 209 country reports, in addition to hundreds of slideshows.

Burkinabè children stand next to a reservoir in Djibo. Image credit: Salym Fayad

A young boy poses for a picture in the northern town of Djibo. He wears a protective amulet around his neck known locally as a gris-gris. Image credit: Salym Fayad

Women pose at their street-food stall at a Sunday afternoon market in central Ouagadougou. Image credit: Salym Fayad

A Burkinabè girl stands for a portrait. Image credit: Salym Fayad

Young boys hold up a board with verses from the Qurʾan written on it. Young Islamic students memorize the Arabic verses by copying the sentences onto their boards. Image credit: Salym Fayad

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: American Samoa

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Flag of American Samoa, via CultureGrams

The new American Samoa report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about American Samoa:

  • American Samoa is home to only three kinds of native land mammals, all of which are bats.
  • American Samoa is the southernmost territory of the United States.
  • American Samoa uses the U.S. Postal Service for mail delivery and is small enough to have just one zip code.
  • One of the traditional symbols of American Samoa is the fue (coconut fiber fly whisk) crossed with a to’oto’o (staff). The fue stands for wisdom, while the to’oto’o represents authority.

Read about life as a kid in American Samoa, traditional foods, and the role religion plays in American Samoan culture, all in this colorful new report.

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Marshall Islands

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Flag of the Marshall Islands via CultureGrams

The new Marshall Islands report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about the Marshall Islands:

  • The average elevation of each island is just 7 feet (2 meters) above sea level.
  • Marshallese society is traditionally matrilineal (based on the mother’s family line), and land is passed down from one generation to the next through the mother’s line.
  • Elugelab is an extinct island that was used as a hydrogen bomb test site by the United States military and was blown up in 1954. The blast left behind a crater more than a mile wide and 165 feet (50 meters) deep.
  • Similar to the Hawaiian word aloha, the Marshallese word yokwe means “hello,” “good-bye,” and “love.”

Read about the the Marshallese culture of sharing and caring for one another, life as a kid, and favorite sports, all in this colorful new report.

CultureGrams: New Interviews for Afghanistan and Comoros!

Blue Mosque – Shrine of Hazrat Ali, by Lukaszcom, via Wikimedia Commons

We’ve recently added interviews from two Afghan women to the Afghanistan country report. Hear first-hand what life is like in Afghanistan for Farah and Zohal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve also added interviews to the Comoros report! Take a look at them to get a feel for life in different areas in the Comoros Islands among different age groups and socioeconomic backgrounds.Fatima, female, age 29

Patrice, male, age 43

Nourou, female, age 9

 

CultureGrams — New Kids Country: Togo

The CultureGrams editors are excited to announce a new Kids edition country report!

Flag of Togo via CultureGrams

The new Togo report includes detailed information on the history, culture, language, food, and daily life of this country.

Here are some interesting Did You Knows about the Togo:

  • Togo is believed to have been named after a town on the shore of Lake Togo. The name comes from the Ewe words to (water) and go (shore).
  • Most homes in Togo do not have running water, so fetching water is a common daily chore for children.
  • Among the Ewe, babies are named after the day of the week they are born but are often given a personal first name as well.
  • To show respect, young people kneel when greeting an elder.

Read about the annual Evala festival, life as a kid, and traditional foods, all in this colorful new report.

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