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Archive for the ‘Historical Newspapers’ Category

Stay Tuned to Training this Fall

K12 Team 2Summer’s passing quickly. Before you know it, we’ll be into an all-new school year! Coming with the new school year will be many exciting new updates and changes to learn about in your ProQuest resources, including Ebooks, SIRS Discoverer, CultureGrams, and ProQuest databases. You can see and learn more about these and all of your ProQuest resources by joining the Training and Consulting Partners in one of our free monthly webinars. Alternately, you can contact us directly to get some one-on-one time or to schedule time for a group of educators in your school or district. There’s a lot of great things to learn this year — join us and we’ll keep you up-to-date!

Stay Tuned to Training this Fall

K12 Team 3Summer’s passing quickly. Before you know it, we’ll be into an all-new school year! Coming with the new school year will be many exciting new updates and changes to learn about in your ProQuest resources, including Ebooks, SIRS Discoverer, CultureGrams, and ProQuest databases. You can see and learn more about these and all of your ProQuest resources by joining the Training and Consulting Partners in one of our free monthly webinars. Alternately, you can contact us directly to get some one-on-one time or to schedule time for a group of educators in your school or district. There’s a lot of great things to learn this year — join us and we’ll keep you up-to-date!

Four ProQuest Resources on Jobs for Youth and Minimum Wage

Good news!

Summer job prospects for young people in the U.S. are looking rosier this year than in previous years and many are paying higher than the federal minimum wage.

During and after the Great Recession (2007-2009) and the years immediately following, jobs were scarce, especially for teens. But this summer, entry level positions are freeing up and youth unemployment, while still higher than the overall unemployment rate, is lower than it has been in years. And, according to a national survey conducted between February 11 and March 6, 2015 on behalf of CareerBuilder by Harris Poll, 53% of employers offering summer jobs are offering positions paying $15 or more per hour on average.

Delve into the following four ProQuest products to learn more about jobs for teens and young adults as well as the issue of minimum wage, which according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, disproportionately affects the young (50.4% are ages 16 to 24).

1. eLibrary 

eLibrary offers two editorially-created Research Topic pages on Summer Jobs and Teenagers and Minimum Wage. These pages include links to handpicked articles, websites, primary source documents, videos, and images. You can find these pages via keyword search or by clicking on the following link on the search page:

research topic link

Summer Jobs and Teenagers

Screenshot of eLibrary Research Topic, Summer Jobs, and Teenagers

2. ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher 

ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher contains a Minimum Wage leading issue. Inside this issue, you can find an overview, key definitions, an interactive map on minimum wage laws in the United States, articles on multiple perspectives, and much more. The Minimum Wage essential question, with supporting pro-con questions, asks the following question:

minimum wage essential question

Screenshot of SIRS Issues Researcher Essential Question for the Minimum Wage Leading Issue

3. CultureGrams

CultureGrams provides a trove of reliable, up-to-date cultural content, including an infographic of an average person for each country. Faces of the World Interviews offer an intimate glimpse into the life of an ordinary person–an adult, teen or child–within a particular country. Take a look at some of the youth interviews to glean information and discover what is involved in a typical day, including education and/or any type of job they hold.

Here is an excerpt from a CultureGrams interview with 16-year-old Ali of Mopti, Mali, when he was asked to describe a typical day of the week for him:

ali

Screencap from CultureGrams Faces of the World Interview with Ali, age 16, Mopti, Mali

The first thing I do is feed the goats in the garden. After this, I wash myself and go to the shore of the river to see if one of the fishermen needs help in their pinasse. The pinasse is the motor boat that the fishermen use in the river to go fishing or sometimes to go to other villages and bring people or food to Mopti. There are many of those in Mopti. Sometimes there is no work, so I have to go back home and stay there, but if I find work, then I go with the fisherman and help him load the pinasse and drive it in the river. Then at the end of the day, they pay me some money. Sometimes it is not much, because it depends if they have to transport people or not. If they get a lot of fish, then they give me some of it, and I take it back home to my mother.

4. Historical Newspapers (Graphical) 

Historical Newspapers (Graphical) contains full-text historical newspaper articles covering the enactment of minimum wage laws in the United States. From either the Topics or Timeline tabs, you can click on The Great Depression and locate the Great Depression & Labor Subtopic to learn about the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established minimum wages and also set child labor guidelines.

Additionally, Historical Newspapers is an excellent resource for learning about what types of jobs teens and young adults held in decades past to compare with the typical jobs of today. A keyword search narrowed to the decades of the 1920s and 1930s and using the words “summer jobs” and “girls” and results in all sorts of interesting articles that provide a window into the past about the types of summer work done by girls or young women. Some jobs mentioned are typical — such as camp counselor or waitress — but others, such as the ones mentioned below are of a more unusual nature.

Capturing Baby Elk

Screencap of a ProQuest Historical Newspaper article from the June 24, 1928, edition of the Daily Boston Globe

1921 Historical Newspaper Article

Screencap of a ProQuest Historical Newspaper article from the June 4, 1921, edition of The Baltimore Sun

We are constantly adding new material to our products.

If you have suggestions for new topics for consideration for our products, feel free to let us know in the comments section below or tweet us at #ProQuest.

eLibrary Curriculum Edition (June Feature) and All K-12 Training

elibce2015

eLibrary’s been around for a while.

But, do you really know eLibrary? What about the “Curriculum Edition” of eLibrary?

If things seem a little fuzzy, that’s OK! Come and join the Training and Consulting Partners at ProQuest for a refresher on eLibrary Curriculum Edition. It’s our feature webinar for June. You can register for eLibrary Curriculum Edition — as well as any of our other great K-12 resources — by going to our K-12 webinars page.  Sign up for eLibrary Curriculum Edition directly using the links below:

eLibrary Curriculum Edition June 10th

eLibrary Curriculum Edition June 17th

If the posted times just don’t fit your schedule, contact our team at training@proquest.com to arrange a privately scheduled class. We’ll see you soon in class!

Five ProQuest Resources on Economic Inequality

Last week, the AFL-CIO released its annual “CEO-to-worker pay” ratio, which showed that the average S&P 500 company CEO made 373 times the salary of the average production and non-supervisory worker in 2014. And a research paper published earlier in the year by Oxfam shows that by next year, the richest 1% will own more than all of the rest of the world’s population.

“During periods when the very rich took home a much smaller proportion of total income–as in the Great Prosperity between 1947 and 1977–the nation as a whole grew faster and median wages surged.”–Robert B. Reich, Former U.S. Secretary of Labor

For both Republicans and Democrats, one of the key issues emerging in the 2016 U.S. presidential election is economic inequality.  Economists, politicians and others have proposed a wide range of public policy solutions for addressing income inequality. In his 2014 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama proposed raising the national minimum wage, and shortly after signed an Executive Order to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 for people working on new federal service contracts. Other solutions include reforming the tax system; strengthening social safety provisions, such as welfare; increasing access to education and healthcare; and strengthening the power of labor unions. Some, such as Economist David Malpass, argue for downsizing the government and suggest that we should aim to raise incomes for all as opposed to trying to reduce the disparity between incomes.

“Americans in the top 1 percent are convenient scapegoats….There’s a backlash and a tendency to see less economic inequality as a solution to all manner of problems. We create simplistic narratives and imagine that punishing the rich will miraculously uplift the poor. This vents popular resentments, even as it encourages self-deception.”–Robert J Samuelson, Columnist, The Washington Post

ProQuest Resources

Economic inequality is a heated issue, promising to be one of the most significant socioeconomic trends of our time. Below I highlight five ProQuest resources to help students understand its possible impact on our societies and economies.

1ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher Leading Issues contain an Economic Policy, U.S. issue, which includes a sub issue on Economic Inequality. Related issues include, but are not limited to, Business Ethics, Federal Government and Economic Policy, Global Financial Crisis, and Minimum Wage. Inside every Leading Issue, students can find an overview on the issue, key definitions, an editorial cartoon or multimedia piece, articles on multiple perspectives to support their research, and more. The Economic Inequality essential question, with supporting pro con questions, asks students the following question: 

Economic Inequality

Screenshot of Economic Inequality Leading Issue, ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

2. eLibrary Research Topics offer an assortment of  editorially-created Research Topic pages on Economic Inequality and related issues, including Executive Pay, Global Economic Crisis, Minimum Wage, Poverty, and the Occupy Movement, a protest movement begun in 2011 which brought attention to the growing divide between the 1% and the rest of the population. These pages include links to carefully selected articles, websites, primary source documents, videos and images. Students can find these pages via keyword search or by clicking on the following link on the search page:

eLibrary link

Economic Inequality in the U.S. (see below) is one such Research Topic page:

eLibrary Research Topic Page

Screenshot of an eLibrary Research Topic Page on Economic Inequality in the U.S.

3. CultureGrams  offers reliable, up-to-date daily life and cultural content, including primary source interviews, videos and more. Students researching  Economic Inequality can use it to compare and contrast the economy in different countries. Each country profiled in CultureGrams contains a section on the country’s economy as well as an Average Person infographic that depicts GDP (PPP) per capita and other demographic characteristics of a hypothetical average person of the country. Below is an example of an Average Person infographic for the United States:

Average Person USA Infographic

Screenshot of CultureGram’s Average Person Infographic for the USA.

4. History Study Center,  with its in-depth study units with historical reference material, is an excellent resource for students who want to dig into earlier periods of extreme economic inequality, such as the start of the Great Depression in the late 1920’s, in order to compare with the situation in the world today. Each unit includes both primary and secondary sources, including biographies, maps and video clips.

history study center

Screenshot of a History Study Center Study Unit on The Great Depression, 1929-1939

5. Historical Newspapers (Graphical) enables students to delve into a trove of full-text historical newspaper articles to see how the level of concentration of income has fluctuated throughout its history and examine its impact on societies. Students can access newspaper articles via keyword search or through the timeline or topics tab. Below is an example of a newspaper article from the Great Depression:

newspaper article 1933

Screenshot of Dec. 3, 1933, New York Times article from ProQuest’s Historical Newspapers

We are constantly adding new material to our products. If you have suggestions for new Economic Inequality topics for consideration for our products, feel free to let us know in the comments section below or tweet us at #ProQuest.

Training Classes for May and June Posted

TCP PageOur ProQuest resources are continuously on the move, so it’s always a great idea to keep up with everything that’s going on. Come and join us for K-12 Training Classes! We’ve got some great webinars on the schedule, and we’ve posted now for May and June. We can help fill in the gaps for you, so you can get the most possible from your resources.

Are you just curious about our expansive collection of resources? Maybe you’re not only teaching, but are also a student yourself. Or maybe you’re interested in outside resources that could potentially have a good K-12 connection. Access our full webinar class schedule and learn about what ProQuest is doing outside of your school!

Do you have a class you’d like us to provide or a topic you’d like us to address? We’re happy to work with you directly and we’d love to hear from you! You can email us at training@proquest.com and we’ll get back in touch with you quickly to answer questions or make arrangements.

Spring Training

TCP PageOur ProQuest resources are always on the move, so it’s always a great idea to keep up with everything that’s going on. Come and join us for K-12 Spring Training! We’ve got some great webinars on the schedule this spring. We can help fill in the gaps for you, so you can get the most possible from your resources.

Are you just curious about our expansive collection of resources? Maybe you’re not only teaching, but are also a student yourself. Or maybe you’re interested in outside resources that could potentially have a good K-12 connection. Access our full webinar class schedule and learn about what ProQuest is doing outside of your school!

Do you have a class you’d like us to provide or a topic you’d like us to address? We’re happy to work with you directly and we’d love to hear from you! You can email us at training@proquest.com and we’ll get back in touch with you quickly to answer questions or make arrangements.

Become Proficient, Get More Out of Your ProQuest Resources

Training

Taking some time to review training options available to you in enhancing your experience with all of our exceptional ProQuest resources. . .

The ProQuest Training and Consulting Partners offer the following options:

  • Informational “how-to” monthly public webinars (no cost)
  • Privately arranged “how-to” online meetings for individuals or groups (no cost)
  • Privately arranged meetings with focus on areas of your choice (no cost)
  • On-site “how-to” or special focus training meetings (no costlimited availability — contact us)
  • Recorded training sessions and videos (no cost)

We can show you more. Join the ProQuest Training and Consulting Partners in one of our free monthly webinars to learn how ProQuest can make success easier in student projects.

Do you have a class you’d like us to provide or a topic you’d like us to address? We’re happy to work with you directly and we’d love to hear from you! You can email us at training@proquest.com and we’ll get back in touch with you quickly to answer questions or make arrangements.

Training Your Way, At Your Convenience, For You And Your Colleagues

Training

Taking some time to review training options available to you in enhancing your experience with all of our exceptional ProQuest resources. . .

The ProQuest Training and Consulting Partners offer the following options:

  • Informational “how-to” monthly public webinars (no cost)
  • Privately arranged “how-to” online meetings for individuals or groups (no cost)
  • Privately arranged meetings with focus on areas of your choice (no cost)
  • On-site “how-to” or special focus training meetings (no costlimited availability — contact us)
  • Recorded training sessions and videos (no cost)

We can show you more. Join the ProQuest Training and Consulting Partners in one of our free monthly webinars to learn how ProQuest can make success easier in student projects.

Do you have a class you’d like us to provide or a topic you’d like us to address? We’re happy to work with you directly and we’d love to hear from you! You can email us at training@proquest.com and we’ll get back in touch with you quickly to answer questions or make arrangements.

Six ProQuest Resources for Holocaust Remembrance Day

We teach so that genocide on a mass scale, the specialty of the past century, can be circumvented in the future.”
― Bogdan Michalski, Why Should We Teach about the Holocaust?

As the quote above states, learning about genocide is more than a history lesson–it is an essential life lesson. Never forget. For this reason, the United Nations General Assembly designates each January 27–the anniversary of the liberation of concentration camp Auschwitz-Birkenau–as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. On this day, the United Nations encourages member states to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust and to develop educational programs to prevent future acts of genocide.

As many countries, including Germany, Austria and France, and several U.S. states have mandatory Holocaust education in the schools, I highlight six ProQuest products where you can find a wealth of resources designed to meet the needs of students learning about the Holocaust and genocide.

1. ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher contains a Human Rights Leading Issue, which includes sub issues on Holocaust Denial and Genocide. Here, students can find timelines with links, overviews and articles on multiple perspectives to support their research. Perfect for debates or papers analyzing more than one side to an issue, each sub issue contains an essential question with supporting pro con articles. The Holocaust Denial essential question asks students the following question:

Should Holocaust denial be a crime punishable by law?

human rights

Visual Browse of the Human Rights Leading Issue, ProQuest SIRS Issues Researcher

 

2. eLibrary offers more than fifty well-crafted Research Topic pages on the Holocaust, genocide and related issues. These pages are powerful visual testimonies with links to carefully selected articles, websites as well as a trove of primary source documents, videos and images.  Students can find these pages via keyword search or by clicking on the following link on the search page:

eLibrary link to list of Research Topics

Screenshot of eLibrary link to list of Research Topics

Rescue of the Danish Jews (see below) is one such Research Topic page:

Rescue of the Danish Jews

Example Research Topic Page, ProQuest eLibrary

 

3. Access CultureGrams to get concise historical overviews and maps of the countries in which the Holocaust occurred. CultureGrams is a fantastic resource full of reliable, up-to-date cultural content, including primary source interviews, videos and more. Students researching the Holocaust can use it to compare contemporary society with the ideologies, policies and governing methods of the totalitarian regimes during the time of the Holocaust.

CultureGrams: Germany

Screenshot of Germany in CultureGrams

 

4. History Study Center has in-depth study units with historical reference material on the Holocaust, Genocide in the Twentieth Century and more. Each unit includes both primary and secondary sources, including biographies, maps and video clips.

history study center

The Holocaust Study Unit, ProQuest History Study Center

 

5. Historical Newspapers (Graphical) offers a unique collection on the Holocaust with full-text newspaper articles from that time period. Students can access the collection via the timeline or the Topics tab.

historic newspaper article

Nov. 12, 1938, New York Times article via ProQuest Historical News Graphical

 

6. ProQuest Research Companion is a terrific resource that supports information literacy, writing and research skills to help students to effectively find, verify and use information. One of the valuable tools in this resource is the Source Evaluation Aid, which provides website information, such as top level domain, site owner and site description. This tool also indicates whether or not a particular site a student accesses online is a possible hate site, which is useful because sometimes it is not readily apparent whether or not a site might belong to a hate group.

Screenshot of the Source Evaluation Aid tool in ProQuest Research Companion

Screenshot of the Source Evaluation Aid tool in ProQuest Research Companion. The red flag alerts users that the website accessed is a possible hate site. The URL entered in this example belongs to the Committee for Open Debate on the Holocaust (CODOH), which is listed in the Southern Poverty Law Center as an active Holocaust Denial group.

We are constantly adding new material to our products. If you have suggestions for new Holocaust topics for consideration for our products, feel free to let us know in the comments section below or tweet us at #ProQuest.

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