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CultureGrams Provinces Edition Scavenger Hunt

CultureGrams Provinces Edition

And now for the final installment in our series of fun scavenger hunts to help students learn more about the resources available to them in CultureGrams. The first hunt was designed to familiarize users with the World Edition. Then we created a hunt for the Kids Edition and another for the States Edition. Now, last but not least, we have this Provinces Edition scavenger hunt. By working through these twenty questions, either in groups or individually, students will not only learn more about the provinces and territories of Canada, but also about the Provinces Edition of CultureGrams and the variety of content it offers. When students have completed the scavenger hunt, they will be much better prepared to do their own research in CultureGrams, whether to prepare a presentation, create a poster, or write an essay.

CultureGrams Provinces Edition Map

Provinces Edition Scavenger Hunt

*The information in parentheses after each item indicates where the answer can be found.

  1. How many total province and territories are there in Canada? (edition landing page)
  2. What are the three oceans that border Canada? (Canada Political or Physical Map)
  3. What is the name of the northernmost island of Canada? (Canada Physical Map)
  4. What are three ways to navigate to a specific province/territory report from the Provinces Edition landing page? (Provinces Edition landing page)
  5. What is Head-Smashed-In Buffalo Jump? (Alberta Landing Page)
  6. Quebec is the world’s largest producer of what? (Quebec Resources and Industries)
  7. What is a “potlatch”? (Yukon First Nations)
  8. What unfortunate event happened in the capital of Newfoundland in 1892? (Newfoundland and Labrador Time Line)
  9. Why is salmon farming an environmental issue in British Columbia? (British Colombia Environmental Issues)
  10. After the War of 1812, many immigrants moved to Nova Scotia. Where were most of them from? (Nova Scotia Responsible Government)
  11. Where is “Canada’s Chocolate Town” and how did it get that name? (New Brunswick Cultural Notes)
  12. What are the average seasonal high and low temperatures (Centigrade) in Nunavut in winter? (Nunavut Climate)
  13. What are some key issues facing the government of the Northwest Territories? (Northwest Territories Government)
  14. List a famous baseball, basketball, and hockey team that make Ontario their home (link to Major League Sports Teams from Provinces Edition landing page)
  15. Name three animals found on the provincial coat of arms for Manitoba. (Manitoba Official Emblems)
  16. What is a “saskatoon” that is used to make Saskatoon Pie in Saskatchewan? (Saskatchewan Recipes)
  17. What province/territory has the highest percentage of high school graduates age 15+ (Graphs and Tables)
  18. How far is it from Kensington in Prince Edward Island to Pelly Crossing in Yukon? (Distance Calculator can be accessed from any province/territory landing page)
  19. What is the motto for Prince Edward Island and what does it mean? (Prince Edward Island landing page)
  20. Which province or territory would you most want to visit and why?

To find the correct answers, check in the comments area. And be sure to let us know how the scavenger hunt works for your classes.

CultureGrams States Edition Scavenger Hunt

This is the third in a series of fun scavenger hunts that our editorial staff has created to help students learn more about the resources available to them in CultureGrams. The first hunt was designed to familiarize users with the World Edition. Then we created one for the Kids Edition. Now this newest scavenger hunt is for the States Edition. By working through these eighteen questions, either in groups or individually, students will learn about the state reports in the database, what categories of information are available, what supplemental features there are, how to cite CultureGrams as a source, and much more. And when students have completed the scavenger hunt, they will be much better prepared to do their own research in CultureGrams to prepare a presentation, create a poster, or write an essay because they will know what information the product has to offer them to do their work.

States Edition Scavenger Hunt

*The information in parentheses after each item indicates where the answer can be found.

  1. List four of the rivers shown on the USA physical map (States Edition landing page – USA Maps)
  2. What are runza or bierocks? (Nebraska Recipes)
  3. What are the states that have the five highest populations of American Indians & Alaska Natives as a percentage of their total population? (Build-Your-Own Comparison Tables)
  4. What animal is at the center of the Wyoming flag? (Flag Gallery)
  5. What two famous astronauts came from Ohio. (Ohio – Famous People)
  6. What happened in 1853 in California? (California – Time Line)
  7. What is the state bird of Rhode Island and where in CultureGrams can you hear its song? (Rhode Island – State Symbols)
  8. What are the average high and low summer temperatures in Mississippi? (Mississippi – Climate)
  9. On what holiday did Nevada become a state in 1864? (Nevada landing page)
  10. Who was “the Wizard of Menlo Park” and what is he famous for? (New Jersey – The Wizard of Menlo Park)
  11. How many counties does South Dakota have? (South Dakota Government)
  12. What were the first four states to be added to the Union? (Graphs and Tables – Statehood)
  13. Where would you find a printable outline map of Illinois to label? (Illinois landing page – Map)
  14. How far is it from Seattle, Washington to Miami, Florida? (Washington – Distance Calculator)
  15. Hawaii is the only U.S. state where _________ are the largest racial group and __________ are a minority. (Hawaii – Population)
  16. What made Model T cars more popular than previous cars? (Michigan – The Model T and Motor City)
  17. If you were compiling a bibliography of sources for your report on Vermont, and you needed to create a correct MLA citation for the information on Vermont’s maple syrup, what would it look like? (Vermont – Maple Syrup)
  18. Which U.S. state would you most like to visit on vacation and why?

To find the correct answers, check in the comments area. And be sure to let us know how the scavenger hunt works for your classes.

CultureGrams: The Importance of Maps

World Map via CultureGrams

Have you ever thought about why maps are so important? Maps can help orient us. They can tell us where we are and where we want to go. Maps can help us find things. They offer a visual way to comprehend the world we live in and even worlds beyond ours. They provide perspective from high up or at a micro level.  They can be valuable in providing context, making comparisons, identifying connections or patterns, and even in predicting what lies ahead. Whether in the classroom or outside it, maps are valuable tools for teaching and learning. No wonder that developing map skills is a part of Common Core and other national and state curriculum standards.

Gabon Detail Map via CultureGrams

 

In CultureGrams you’ll find a wide variety of maps to help users learn. There are simple maps, physical maps, political maps, regional maps, detail maps, and county maps. And there are outline maps that are not only useful in their own right, but that students can use to create their own maps to reflect what they find interesting about a particular region, country, state,or province.

Denmark Outline Map via CultureGrams

To add further value to the wide variety of CultureGrams maps, our editorial staff has created a number of map-related learning activities that teachers can use for in-class projects or homework assignments. Students can use maps to understand the worldwide popularity of soccer in The World Game, as part of a “Geography Bee.” Or they can learn more about the impact of colonialism in Africa and elsewhere through such activities as “Colonization of Africa” or “Cricket and Colonization.”

CultureGrams Kids Edition Scavenger Hunt

In order to be successful in using a research database, students need to learn how that database works, of course–what content it offers, how the database can best be navigated, and what tools and features are available to help them in their research. And with all the databases and other online resources out there, it is a real challenge to find the time to train younger users on how to use the wide array of resources that are available to them.

But all is not lost! We’ve come up with a new scavenger hunt to help students become familiar with the CultureGrams Kids Edition. This is in addition to the scavenger hunt that we already developed for CultureGrams more broadly. By working through these twenty questions, either in groups or individually, students will learn about the country reports in the database and what categories of information are available, what supplemental features there are, how the data tables work, what multimedia resources they can access, how to cite CultureGrams as a source, and much more. And when students have completed the scavenger hunt, they will be much better prepared to do their own research in CultureGrams to prepare a presentation, create a poster, or write an essay because they will know what information the product has to offer them to do their work.

Kids Edition Scavenger Hunt

*Each of the questions is followed by parenthetical information that suggests where the answers can be found.

1. What tree is a national symbol of Haiti? (Haiti country landing page)
2. What is a smorgasbord in Sweden? (Sweden Food category)
3. What are the 5 largest and 5 smallest countries in the world? (Extremes Data Tables or Build-Your-Own)
4. The Netherlands has twice as many __________ as cars. (Netherlands landing page/Did You Knows)
5. How do you say (Can You Say It)
a. “Let’s have a barbecue” in Aussie English? (Australia Can You Say It)
b. “Hello” in Hindi in India? (India Can You Say It)
c. “No” in German? (Germany Can You Say It)
d. “Please” in Somali (Somalia Can You Say It)
6. What are some of the chores that kids in Madagascar do each day? (Madagascar Like as a Kid category)
7. Find a recipe from three countries on three different continents. (Recipes)
8. Find two interviews of children from two separate countries. List two things you have in common with the children and two things that are different. (Interviews)
9. What is the average life expectancy of a Brazilian compared to the average life expectancy of someone in the world as a whole? (Brazil landing page/Infographic)
10. What percentage of New Zealand’s population is Hindu? (New Zealand Religion category/pie chart)
11. What happened in 1219 in Afghanistan? (Afghanistan History category/Time Line)
12. Name one famous person from Mexico and tell what made them famous. (Mexico Famous People)
13. According to the Money and Economy category for Chile, Chile is the world’s largest producer of what? (Chili Money and Economy category)
14. Which country has the highest percentage of women in parliament? Spain, Thailand, or the United States? (Country Data Tables)
15. How far is it from the capital of Ukraine to the capital of Nicaragua? (Distance Calculator)
16. Find the photo “Cowboy” in the Myanmar photo gallery. What is the cowboy in the photo herding? (Myanmar Photo Gallery)
17. What type of vehicle is used to retrieve children from school in the video “School Pickup” from Vietnam. (Vietnam Video)
18. Create an MLA citation for the flag of Togo. (Flag Gallery or Togo landing page)
19. Of all the countries in the world, which one would you most like to visit? Explain why.
20. If you could live in any country in the world other than the country where you currently live, what would you choose and why?

To find the correct answers, check in the comments area. And be sure to let us know how the scavenger hunt works for your classes.

Demonstrate Your Vexillological Prowess! U.S. State Flag Quiz!

CultureGrams States Edition Data Extremes

People like knowing how things compare. They want to know who was first/last, who has the most/least of something, what is the highest/lowest or biggest/smallest, etc. Comparisons can be interesting trivia, but they can also help us put information in context.

CultureGrams makes it easy to discover comparative statistical information through our data tables, whether it’s our standard tables or through the customized data tables you can create for yourself. Take the States Edition, for example. Do you want to know the first/last state to be admitted to the Union? Would you like to find out which states have the largest/smallest populations or which are most/least densely populated? What about the states with the highest/lowest percentages of foreign-born residents, females, or high school graduates? We’ve compiled a list of such questions that could be used as a quiz or a research assignment. For answers to the questions and much more, check out our States Edition Graphs and Tables page (we’ll also include the answers in the Comments area of this post).

States Edition Graphs and Tables Page via ProQuest CultureGrams

  1. Which was the first state to be added to the Union?
  2. Which was the last state to be added to the Union?
  3. Which is the largest state in terms of total area?
  4. Which is the smallest state in terms of total area?
  5. Which state has the largest population?
  6. Which state has the smallest population?
  7. Which is the most densely populated state?
  8. Which is the least densely populated state?
  9. Which state grew the fastest between 2010 and 2015?
  10. Which state grew the slowest between 2010 and 2015?
  11. Which state has the highest percentage of females?
  12. Which state has the lowest percentage of females?
  13. Which state has the highest percentage of foreign-born residents?
  14. Which state has the lowest percentage of foreign-born residents?
  15. Which state has the highest percentage of people under 18 years old?
  16. Which state has the lowest percentage of people under 18 years old?
  17. Which state has the highest percentage of graduates from high school?
  18. Which state has the lowest percentage of graduate from high school?
  19. Which state has the highest median household income?
  20. Which state has the lowest median household income?
  21. Which state has the highest average travel time to work?
  22. Which state has the lowest average travel time to work?

Let us know how you do. And are you surprised by any of the answers to these questions?

CultureGrams: What We Added in 2016

It’s time for an annual update on what we’ve added to CultureGrams in the past year. Our editorial team is definitely not standing still. The product just keeps getting better and better as we push forward on our commitment to providing high quality cultural, historical, and geographical information.

Faroe Islands Kids Report via ProQuest CultureGrams

This is just a partial list of accomplishments from 2016.

  • We added 24 new Kids Edition country reports to CultureGrams and are very near to completing that edition. Only two more countries to go and we’ll have reports for every country in the World Edition. That should happen in early 2017
  • We added 46 new interviews to the Faces of the World Interview collection.
  • CultureGrams is now integrated with Google Drive and Google Classroom.
  • We expanded our multimedia offerings by adding 430 new gallery photos, 73 new slideshows, and 102 new videos to CultureGrams.
  • We updated the Average Person infographics, which depict the demographic characteristics of a hypothetical average person in each country, highlighting factors such as income level, family size, language, and religion.
  • We updated all of our data tables.
  • We’re continuing with our regular and ongoing process of major updates and reviews of all CultureGrams reports and other content by native and in-country experts.

And the work continues in 2017. We’re already busy adding  interviews, photos, slideshows, video, etc. And we’re always working to improve our existing content. Stay tuned for what is to come!

By the way, if we haven’t said so recently or often enough, we really appreciate your interest in CultureGrams. We have fantastic customers and we are very grateful for you!

CultureGrams Extremes Tables

Can you list the ten largest countries in the world? What about the smallest? Can you name the ten most populous countries? The ten countries with the youngest or oldest populations? Do you know which countries have the most women in parliament or the fewest internet users? What countries have the largest number of airports or the smallest number of physicians per 10,000 people. For answers to these and many other questions, check out CultureGrams Extremes Data Tables. These fascinating tables list top and bottom ten countries in a variety of categories. Links to the tables can be found in the lower portion of the left navigation bar on our Graphs and Tables page.

Extremes Table via ProQuest CultureGrams

But these top ten and bottom ten tables aren’t included merely as a source of geographical  and cultural trivia. They can also foster discussion and critical thinking. Students might be asked to think about why particular countries are on a specific Extremes table and what those countries have in common. For example, what do countries with a low population density have in common? What factors might result in certain countries having high or low life expectancy?

Also, they could discuss the impact of a country being very high or low in a particular category. What impact does it have on a country if it has low public school enrollment or high life expectancy? What effect might an aging population have on a country? What about a very young population?

And another option might be to look at some of the tables and consider how certain data in the tables might be misinterpreted. If one looks at the countries with the highest public spending on education, does that mean that those populations are the best educated? Why or why not?

Although they make up only a small part of the CultureGrams database, the Extremes tables are a tool that will  yield valuable insights to those who are able to think critically about what is revealed in the numbers.

CultureGrams Scavenger Hunt

Are you looking for an engaging way to help your students learn about the countries of the world? We just want to remind you that we’ve put together a scavenger hunt that will help them do that, and students will become familiar with some of the content and features available in the CultureGrams World Edition as well. The activity requires students (either individually or in groups) to answer a series of questions on an assigned country by “scavenging” through the product. And in the process, they learn about some of our standard CultureGrams categories, plus features like the Currency Converter, Data Tables, Famous People, Photos, and Recipes.

world-edition

CultureGrams World Edition via ProQuest

Most of the questions are factual in nature, but there are critical thinking questions as well. The scavenger hunt can be an activity that you use on its own or it can be a way to teach students how to use CultureGrams for country research as preparation for working on their own.

cg-learning-activity

CultureGrams Scavenger Hunt via ProQuest

Check it out by clicking here. Enjoy!

CultureGrams: Critical Thinking

A great way to foster critical thinking and engaged learning in your students is to help them learn to ask good questions, to push beyond the obvious, to see purely factual data points in a broader context. Asking good questions promotes independent thinking, stimulates curiosity, increases understanding, and helps people see how seemingly disparate ideas connect.

We encourage teachers to use CultureGrams to promote critical thinking in their classrooms. There are many ways to do so. You might ask students, for example, why many major metropolitan areas are often located in coastal areas or near major waterways. Take Australia, China, Canada, or Brazil, for example. Look at where many of the largest cities are concentrated. Why aren’t the cities scattered more evenly across these countries? The answers to these questions may vary, depending on the country. You could discuss the significance of trade and access to foreign markets; the importance of water to sustain life and as a means of travel; the influence of history, geography, and climate on settlement and growth; etc. Encourage students to ask why things are the way they are. This can lead them to insights they may not have had previously.

Brazil Simple Map

Brazil Map via ProQuest CultureGrams

You could also ask students to think about what countries in a particular region have in common besides just occupying a particular part of the world. Have students think about the many of the island nations of Oceania, for instance. Do they share common geographical features or similar climates? Are there common languages, a common religion, or similar cultural attitudes? How do their economies compare? What common challenges do countries in Oceania face? Also, what differentiates countries in the region? And what is the impact of these similarities and differences on the region as a whole?

Tahiti

Aerial View, Tahiti, French Polynesia (photo by Peter Stone via the CultureGrams Photo Gallery)

Another fruitful area of exploration might be to ask students how the content in one CultureGrams category impacts the content in another. How does the land and climate in a particular country influence the economy? How has a country’s history shaped its linguistic or religious development? How do a culture’s attitudes about family affect how they view dating and marriage?

And lastly, you could ask students to compare statistical data between two or more countries. What does the data reveal? How can the differences in data be explained? For example,  below is a customized table that provides data related to health and life expectancy for Belgium and Uganda. What does the data reveal? What might be some of the root causes for the differences in the numbers?

Belgium Uganda Comparison

To be clear, teachers will need to monitor these kinds of activities/discussions to make sure that students are coming to sound conclusions and not speculating wildly about cause and effect. But that process in itself can be useful in teaching students how to analyze factual information.

Of course, there are many other areas in CultureGrams that you could use to foster critical thinking, but we hope this gets you started thinking of some of the possibilities. Please let us know if you have any great ideas on this topic or if you come up with interesting activities that foster critical thinking.